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Momentum in Taiwan: seasonality matters!


  • Hsiao-Peng Fu
  • Andrew Wood


Previous studies suggest that momentum exists in international stock markets with the exception of Asia. Using a large data set of Taiwanese stocks, we show that momentum does exist, but it is restricted to the months following the deadline for annual statements. During the remaining months, a reverse momentum, or contrarian, strategy produces significant returns. These contrarian returns are particularly high during the national holidays linked to the Lunar New Year and the Lunar Moon Festival.

Suggested Citation

  • Hsiao-Peng Fu & Andrew Wood, 2010. "Momentum in Taiwan: seasonality matters!," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(13), pages 1247-1253.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:17:y:2010:i:13:p:1247-1253 DOI: 10.1080/00036840902917589

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Shangkari V Anusakumar & Ruhani Ali & Chee-Wooi Hooy, 2014. "Are momentum and contrarian effects related? Evidence from the Chinese stock market," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(4), pages 2361-2367.
    2. Hung, Chi-Hsiou D. & Banerjee, Anurag N., 2014. "How do momentum strategies ‘score’ against individual investors in Taiwan, Hong Kong and Korea?," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 67-81.

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