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Emerging Stock Markets Return Seasonalities: the January Effect and the Tax-Loss Selling Hypothesis

Author

Listed:
  • Stilianos Fountas
  • Konstantinos N. Segredakis

    (Department of Economics, National University of Ireland, Galway)

Abstract

We test for seasonal effects in stock returns, the January effect anomaly and the tax-loss selling hypothesis using monthly stock returns in eighteen emerging stock markets for the period 1987-1995. Even though considerable evidence for seasonal effects applies in several countries, we find very little evidence in favour of the January effect and the tax-loss selling hypothesis. These results provide some support to the informational efficiency aspect of the market efficiency hypothesis

Suggested Citation

  • Stilianos Fountas & Konstantinos N. Segredakis, 1999. "Emerging Stock Markets Return Seasonalities: the January Effect and the Tax-Loss Selling Hypothesis," Working Papers 37, National University of Ireland Galway, Department of Economics, revised 1999.
  • Handle: RePEc:nig:wpaper:0037
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    Cited by:

    1. Easterday, Kathryn E. & Sen, Pradyot K., 2016. "Is the January effect rational? Insights from the accounting valuation model," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 168-185.
    2. Girardin, Eric & Liu, Zhenya, 2005. "Bank credit and seasonal anomalies in China's stock markets," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 465-483.
    3. Hasbullah, Faruq & Masih, Mansur, 2016. "Fast profits in a fasting month? A markov regime switching approach in search of ramadan effect on stock markets," MPRA Paper 72149, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Gulseven Osman, 2014. "Multidimensional Analysis of Monthly Stock Market Returns," Scientific Annals of Economics and Business, De Gruyter Open, vol. 61(2), pages 181-196, December.
    5. Filipovski, Vladimir & Tevdovski, Dragan, 2017. "Stock market efficiency in South Eastern Europe: testing return predictability and presence of calendar effects," MPRA Paper 76818, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Krzysztof Borowski, 2016. "Analysis Of Monthly Rates Of Return In April On The Example Of Selected World Stock Exchange Indices," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 11(2), pages 307-325, June.
    7. Keef, Stephen P. & Khaled, Mohammed & Zhu, Hui, 2009. "The dynamics of the Monday effect in international stock indices," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 125-133, June.
    8. Anastassios A. Drakos & Georgios P. Kouretas & Leonidas P. Zarangas, 2010. "Forecasting financial volatility of the Athens stock exchange daily returns: an application of the asymmetric normal mixture GARCH model," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 331-350.
    9. Dritsakis, Nikolaos & Grose, Christos & Kalyvas, Lampros, 2006. "Performance aspects of Greek bond mutual funds," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 189-202.
    10. Moller, Nicholas & Zilca, Shlomo, 2008. "The evolution of the January effect," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 447-457, March.
    11. repec:kap:jrefec:v:56:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11146-016-9564-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Panayiotis Diamandis & Anastassios Drakos & Argyrios Volis, 2007. "The impact of stock incremental information on the volatility of the Athens stock exchange," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(5), pages 413-424.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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