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The total impact of schooling on within-groups wage inequality in Portugal


  • Corrado Andini


Using Portuguese data from the 2001 wave of the European Community Household Panel, we analyse to what extent the endogeneity of schooling affects the estimation of the total impact of schooling on within-groups wage inequality by means of quantile-regression techniques. We conclude that the standard techniques assuming schooling-exogeneity may underestimate the total impact of schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Corrado Andini, 2007. "The total impact of schooling on within-groups wage inequality in Portugal," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 85-90.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:15:y:2007:i:2:p:85-90 DOI: 10.1080/13504850600706677

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Emek Basker, 2005. "Job Creation or Destruction? Labor Market Effects of Wal-Mart Expansion," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 174-183, February.
    2. Basker, Emek, 2005. "Selling a cheaper mousetrap: Wal-Mart's effect on retail prices," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 203-229, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andini, Corrado, 2017. "Tertiary Education for All and Wage Inequality: Policy Insights from Quantile Regression," IZA Policy Papers 132, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Andini, Corrado & Pereira, Pedro T., 2007. "Full-time Schooling, Part-time Schooling, and Wages: Returns and Risks in Portugal," IZA Discussion Papers 2651, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Kasey S. Buckles & Daniel M. Hungerman, 2013. "Season of Birth and Later Outcomes: Old Questions, New Answers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(3), pages 711-724, July.
    4. Andini, Corrado, 2009. "How Fast Do Wages Adjust to Human-Capital Productivity? Dynamic Panel-Data Evidence from Belgium, Denmark and Finland," IZA Discussion Papers 4583, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Arménio Rego & Susana Leal & Miguel Cunha & Jorge Faria & Carlos Pinho, 2010. "How the Perceptions of Five Dimensions of Corporate Citizenship and Their Inter-Inconsistencies Predict Affective Commitment," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 94(1), pages 107-127, June.
    6. Corrado Andini, 2010. "Within-groups wage inequality and schooling: further evidence for Portugal," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(28), pages 3685-3691.
    7. Andersson, Roland & Nabavi Larijani, Pardis & Wilhelmsson, Mats, 2013. "The impact of vocational education and training on income in Sweden," Working Paper Series 13/4, Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Real Estate and Construction Management & Centre for Banking and Finance (cefin).
    8. repec:voj:journl:v:63:y:2016:i:1:p:25-43 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Corrado Andini, 2010. "A dynamic Mincer equation with an application to Portuguese data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(16), pages 2091-2098.

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