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Benefit payments, informal care and female labour supply

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  • Fiona Carmichael
  • Susan Charles

Abstract

This article examines the impact of informal care responsibilities on female earnings and labour supply. It extends previous work on the labour market costs of informal care by examining who, among the full set of carers has access to the two most relevant existing social security benefits (Attendance Allowance and Invalid Care Allowance) and to what effect. Results from previous work using an earlier data set are compared with those obtained here.

Suggested Citation

  • Fiona Carmichael & Susan Charles, 2003. "Benefit payments, informal care and female labour supply," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(7), pages 411-415.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:10:y:2003:i:7:p:411-415
    DOI: 10.1080/1350485032000056873
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carmichael, Fiona & Charles, Sue, 1998. "The labour market costs of community care1," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 747-765, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shimizutani, Satoshi & Suzuki, Wataru & Noguchi, Haruko, 2008. "The socialization of at-home elderly care and female labor market participation: Micro-level evidence from Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 82-96, January.
    2. Andreas Kotsadam, 2012. "The employment costs of caregiving in Norway," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 269-283, December.
    3. Siobhan Austen & Rachel Ong & Therese Jefferson & Rhonda Sharp & Gill Lewin, 2013. "Elder care and the employment intentions of mature age women," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1310, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    4. Jacobs, Josephine C. & Van Houtven, Courtney H. & Laporte, Audrey & Coyte, Peter C., 2015. "Baby Boomer caregivers in the workforce: Do they fare better or worse than their predecessors?," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 6(C), pages 89-101.
    5. Bolin, K. & Lindgren, B. & Lundborg, P., 2008. "Your next of kin or your own career?: Caring and working among the 50+ of Europe," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 718-738, May.
    6. Edwin van Gameren & Durfari Velandia Naranjo, 2015. "Working and Caring: The Simultaneous Decision of Labor Force Participation and Informal Elderly and Child Support Activities in Mexico," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 52(2), pages 117-148, November.
    7. Josephine Jacobs & Courtney Van Houtven & Audrey Laporte & Peter Coyte, 2014. "The Impact of Informal Caregiving Intensity on Women's Retirement in the United States," Working Papers 140008, Canadian Centre for Health Economics.
    8. Nguyen, Ha Trong & Connelly, Luke Brian, 2014. "The effect of unpaid caregiving intensity on labour force participation: Results from a multinomial endogenous treatment model," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 115-122.
    9. Geyer, J.; Korfhage, T.;, 2017. "Long-term care reform and the labor supply of informal caregivers – evidence from a quasi-experiment," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/20, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    10. Annika Meng, 2013. "Informal home care and labor-force participation of household members," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 959-979, April.
    11. Lilly, Meredith B. & Laporte, Audrey & Coyte, Peter C., 2010. "Do they care too much to work? The influence of caregiving intensity on the labour force participation of unpaid caregivers in Canada," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 895-903, December.
    12. repec:iae:iaewps:wp2016n6 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Jacobs, Josephine C. & Lilly, Meredith B. & Ng, Carita & Coyte, Peter C., 2013. "The fiscal impact of informal caregiving to home care recipients in Canada: How the intensity of care influences costs and benefits to government," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 102-109.
    14. Anna Zhu, 2016. "Maternal Employment Trajectories and Caring for an Infant or Toddler with a Disability," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n06, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

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