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Determinants of Domestic Water Use by Rural Households Without Access to Private Improved Water Sources in Benin: A Seemingly Unrelated Tobit Approach

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  • Aminou Arouna

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  • Stephan Dabbert

Abstract

This paper analyzes the determinants of domestic water use in rural areas. The focus is on households without access to private improved water sources. These households use either only free sources, only purchased sources or a combination of free and purchased sources. We also analyze households’ water use behaviors as a function of water availability by explicitly estimating domestic water use for both rainy and dry seasons. Using a Seemingly Unrelated Tobit approach to simultaneously account for the censored nature of water demand and the correlation of error terms between free and purchased water use equations, we find that purchased water demand is perfectly price inelastic due to water scarcity. The important determinants of water use are household size and composition, access to water sources, wealth and time required for fetching water. Nevertheless, the effects of these determinants vary between household types and seasons, and the policy implications of the findings are discussed. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

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  • Aminou Arouna & Stephan Dabbert, 2010. "Determinants of Domestic Water Use by Rural Households Without Access to Private Improved Water Sources in Benin: A Seemingly Unrelated Tobit Approach," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 24(7), pages 1381-1398, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:waterr:v:24:y:2010:i:7:p:1381-1398
    DOI: 10.1007/s11269-009-9504-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Greene, William H, 1981. "On the Asymptotic Bias of the Ordinary Least Squares Estimator of the Tobit Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(2), pages 505-513, March.
    5. Gayatri Acharya & Edward Barbier, 2002. "Using Domestic Water Analysis to Value Groundwater Recharge in the Hadejia'Jama'are Floodplain, Northern Nigeria," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(2), pages 415-426.
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    7. Huang, Cliff J & Sloan, Frank A & Adamache, Killard W, 1987. "Estimation of Seemingly Unrelated Tobit Regressions via the EM Algorithm," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 5(3), pages 425-430, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hazrat Yousaf & Parvez Ahmed & Syed Ammad Ali, 2020. "Determinants of Households’ Budget Allocation to Water Consumption: Evidence from Urban Pakistan," South Asia Economic Journal, Institute of Policy Studies of Sri Lanka, vol. 21(2), pages 281-294, September.
    2. Xuhui Ding & Zixuan Zhang & Fengping Wu & Xiangyi Xu, 2019. "Study on the Evolution of Water Resource Utilization Efficiency in Tibet Autonomous Region and Four Provinces in Tibetan Areas under Double Control Action," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(12), pages 1-11, June.
    3. Georgios Tentes & Dimitrios Damigos, 2012. "The Lost Value of Groundwater: The Case of Asopos River Basin in Central Greece," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 26(1), pages 147-164, January.
    4. O. Idowu & J. Awomeso & O. Martins, 2012. "An Evaluation of Demand for and Supply of Potable Water in an Urban Centre of Abeokuta and Environs, Southwestern Nigeria," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 26(7), pages 2109-2121, May.

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