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Effects of the Great Recession on Immigrants’ Household Consumption in Spain

Author

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  • Ramon Ballester
  • Jackeline Velazco
  • Ricard Rigall-I-Torrent

Abstract

The massive influx of immigrants has played an essential role in the high growth of the Spanish economy during the period 1997–2007. The severe economic crisis that began in 2008 is characterized by high unemployment and reductions in consumption by households. This article uses the Household Budget Survey to empirically estimate changes in the consumption patterns of households as a result of the economic crisis, analyzing whether differential impacts exist according to the nationality of the household’s main breadwinner. Our results show that households with non-Spanish main breadwinners have lower levels of pre-crisis consumption, greater decrease in consumption because of the crisis and greater inequality in consumption levels. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Ramon Ballester & Jackeline Velazco & Ricard Rigall-I-Torrent, 2015. "Effects of the Great Recession on Immigrants’ Household Consumption in Spain," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 771-797, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:123:y:2015:i:3:p:771-797
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-014-0760-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Rosa M. Soriano-Miras & Antonio Trinidad-Requena & Jorge Guardiola, 2020. "The Well-Being of Moroccan Immigrants in Spain: A Composite Indicator," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 148(2), pages 635-653, April.
    2. Filippa Bono & Maria Francesca Cracolici & Miranda Cuffaro, 2017. "A Hierarchical Model for Analysing Consumption Patterns in Italy Before and During the Great Recession," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 134(2), pages 421-436, November.

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