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Carbon emissions accounting for China’s coal mining sector: invisible sources of climate change

Author

Listed:
  • Bing Wang

    () (China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing)
    China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing))

  • Chao-Qun Cui

    () (China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing)
    China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing))

  • Yi-Xin Zhao

    () (China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing)
    China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing))

  • Bo Yang

    () (China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing)
    China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing))

  • Qing-Zhou Yang

    () (China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing))

Abstract

Coal is the primary source of China’s carbon emissions due to the energy structure and its resource endowment. This reality creates enormous pressure and impetus for low-carbon pathways of coal production and consumption. Based on a literature review on carbon emissions accounting methods, this paper builds a source-driven CO2 emissions accounting model for the coal development sector using the emissions factor method. Scenario analysis is employed to predict future carbon emission equivalents and to indicate possible implications for climate change mitigation in this sector. Carbon emissions from coal development are mainly derived from coal mine gas emissions, which yield 62% of the sector’s total carbon emissions, followed by energy consumption. The recent decline in coal mining-driven CO2 emissions is mainly due to the strict deployment of coal mine gas and the changing structure of coal mines. The results from the scenarios suggest that the carbon emissions reduction potential will largely be determined by technology innovation in the coal mine gas industry. Policy implications for further addressing carbon emissions from the supply side of the coal industry include improvements in energy efficiency and coal mine gas extraction and utilization.

Suggested Citation

  • Bing Wang & Chao-Qun Cui & Yi-Xin Zhao & Bo Yang & Qing-Zhou Yang, 2019. "Carbon emissions accounting for China’s coal mining sector: invisible sources of climate change," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 99(3), pages 1345-1364, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:99:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s11069-018-3526-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s11069-018-3526-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Minda Ma & Ran Yan & Weiguang Cai, 2017. "An extended STIRPAT model-based methodology for evaluating the driving forces affecting carbon emissions in existing public building sector: evidence from China in 2000–2015," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 89(2), pages 741-756, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ling Du & Hasan Dinçer & İrfan Ersin & Serhat Yüksel, 2020. "IT2 Fuzzy-Based Multidimensional Evaluation of Coal Energy for Sustainable Economic Development," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(10), pages 1-21, May.

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