IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/minecn/v30y2017i2d10.1007_s13563-016-0097-0.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Linkages between mining and non-mining sectors in Botswana

Author

Listed:
  • Kegomoditswe Koitsiwe

    (Akita University)

  • Tsuyoshi Adachi

    (Akita University
    Akita University)

Abstract

Over the past decades, a negative view of mining has emerged questioning the positive relationship between mineral extraction and economic development with particular attention to developing countries. The debate remains unresolved as mining continues to be an enclave sector in many resource-rich developing countries. In this paper, we examine the linkage between mining and non-mining sectors in the economy of Botswana using time series data from 1976 to 2014. The study adopted statistical tests including the Granger causality test and vector autoregressive (VAR) technique based upon the impulse response function (IRF) and variance decomposition (VD) to observe linkages among variables. The empirical results show a significant causal linkage from mining to manufacturing and services. Our findings are consistent with respect to the statistical tests used. Overall, the results indicate that there is a forward linkage between mining and manufacturing and mining and service sector. The policy implication of the study is that the government of Botswana should consider the development of backward linkage from mining sector such as provision of mining inputs and services by local companies.

Suggested Citation

  • Kegomoditswe Koitsiwe & Tsuyoshi Adachi, 2017. "Linkages between mining and non-mining sectors in Botswana," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 30(2), pages 95-105, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:minecn:v:30:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s13563-016-0097-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s13563-016-0097-0
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13563-016-0097-0
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1007/s13563-016-0097-0?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Teka, Zeferino, 2012. "Linkages to manufacturing in the resource sector: The case of the Angolan oil and gas industry," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 461-467.
    2. Venus Khim-Sen Liew, 2004. "Which Lag Length Selection Criteria Should We Employ?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 3(33), pages 1-9.
    3. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-1072, June.
    4. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1995. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 5398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
    6. Morris, Mike & Kaplinsky, Raphael & Kaplan, David, 2012. "“One thing leads to another”—Commodities, linkages and industrial development," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 408-416.
    7. David de Ferranti & Guillermo E. Perry & Daniel Lederman & William E. Maloney, 2002. "From Natural Resources to the Knowledge Economy : Trade and Job Quality," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 14040.
    8. Corden, W M, 1984. "Booming Sector and Dutch Disease Economics: Survey and Consolidation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(3), pages 359-380, November.
    9. Aroca, Patricio, 2001. "Impacts and development in local economies based on mining: : the case of the Chilean II region," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 119-134, June.
    10. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-438, July.
    11. Clements, Kenneth W. & Johnson, Peter L., 2000. "The minerals industry and employment in Western Australia: assessing its impacts in federal electorates," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 77-89, June.
    12. Adewuyi, Adeolu O. & Ademola Oyejide, T., 2012. "Determinants of backward linkages of oil and gas industry in the Nigerian economy," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 452-460.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Elkhan Richard Sadik-Zada & Wilhelm Loewenstein & Yadulla Hasanli, 2021. "Production linkages and dynamic fiscal employment effects of the extractive industries: input-output and nonlinear ARDL analyses of Azerbaijani economy," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 34(1), pages 3-18, April.
    2. Mia Ellis & Margaret McMillan, 2018. "Optimal local content for extractive industries: How can policies best create benefits for Tanzania?," WIDER Working Paper Series 133, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Mia Ellis & Margaret McMillan, 2018. "Optimal local content for extractive industries: How can policies best create benefits for Tanzania?," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2018-133, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Ahmed, Khalid & Tiwari, Aviral Kumar & Jiao, Zhilun, 2019. "Resource curse hypothesis and role of oil prices in USA," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    2. Bierens, H.J. & Broersma, L., 1991. "The relation between unemployment and interest rate : some international evidence," Serie Research Memoranda 0112, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    3. M. T. Alguacil & V. Orts, 2003. "Inward Foreign Direct Investment and Imports in Spain," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 19-38.
    4. Eva Liljeblom & Sabur Mollah & Patrik Rotter, 2015. "Do dividends signal future earnings in the Nordic stock markets?," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 493-511, April.
    5. Claude Diebolt & Magali Jaoul-Grammare & Faustine Perrin, 2020. "Scolarisation de masse des garçons et des filles. Financement public de l’instruction primaire et croissance économique en France au XIXème siècle," Working Papers of BETA 2020-51, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    6. Neil Karunaratne, 1997. "High-Tech Innovation, Growth and Trade Dynamics in Australia," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 151-170, April.
    7. Bakari, Sayef, 2018. "The Impact of Domestic Investment on Economic Growth New Policy Analysis from Algeria," Bulletin of Economic Theory and Analysis, BETA Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 35-51, March.
    8. Hamdi, Helmi & Sbia, Rashid, 2013. "Dynamic relationships between oil revenues, government spending and economic growth in an oil-dependent economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 118-125.
    9. Richard Tiffin & P. J. Dawson, 2002. "The Demand for Calories: Some Further Estimates from Zimbabwe," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(2), pages 221-232, July.
    10. Xu, Xiaojie, 2014. "Causality and Price Discovery in U.S. Corn Markets: An Application of Error Correction Modeling and Directed Acyclic Graphs," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 169806, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    11. Majumder, Monoj Kumar & Raghavan, Mala & Vespignani, Joaquin, 2020. "Oil curse, economic growth and trade openness," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C).
    12. Farzanegan, Mohammad Reza & Markwardt, Gunther, 2009. "The effects of oil price shocks on the Iranian economy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 134-151, January.
    13. Leon Shilton, 2000. "Random Walks and the Cointegration of the ACLI and NCREIF," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 28(3), pages 435-465.
    14. Committee, Nobel Prize, 2003. "Time-series Econometrics: Cointegration and Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity," Nobel Prize in Economics documents 2003-1, Nobel Prize Committee.
    15. Halicioglu Ferda, 2003. "Testing Wagner's Law for Turkey, 1960-2000," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 1(2), pages 31-42, August.
    16. Dülger, Fikret & Lopcu, Kenan & Burgaç, Almıla & Ballı, Esra, 2013. "Is Russia suffering from Dutch Disease? Cointegration with structural break," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 605-612.
    17. Nguyen, Hong-Oanh & Tongzon, Jose, 2010. "Causal nexus between the transport and logistics sector and trade: The case of Australia," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 135-146, May.
    18. Bahram Adrangi & Arjun Chatrath & Joseph Macri & Kambiz Raffiee, 2021. "Dynamics of crude oil price shocks and major Latin American Equity Markets: A study in time and frequency domains," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 73(3), pages 432-455, July.
    19. Theodore Joyce & Naci Mocan, 1993. "Unemployment and Infant Health: Time-Series Evidence from the State of Tennessee," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(1), pages 185-203.
    20. Ulibarri, Carlos A., 1998. "Is after-hours trading informative?," MPRA Paper 14818, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:minecn:v:30:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s13563-016-0097-0. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Sonal Shukla or Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.