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“One thing leads to another”—Commodities, linkages and industrial development

  • Morris, Mike
  • Kaplinsky, Raphael
  • Kaplan, David

With a particular focus on low income economies in SSA, this paper addresses the nature and determinants of linkages from the commodities sectors and challenges the received view that enclave development is an inherent characteristic of resource extraction, particularly in the hard and energy commodities sectors. It argues that there has been a steady increase in linkage development and that there are significant opportunities for deepening this process. The opportunities may be greater for backward than for forward linkages, particularly in the minerals and energy sectors. In making this case, this Discussion Paper draws on the experience of high income countries which have resource intensive economic structures, the geographical specificity of many resources and the growing interest of large resource extracting firms in outsourcing the production of inputs which are outside of their core competences and in supporting local production of some inputs, it sets out a general model of linkage development which distinguishes between win–win and win–lose outcomes.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Resources Policy.

Volume (Year): 37 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 408-416

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jrpoli:v:37:y:2012:i:4:p:408-416
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  1. Freeman, Chris, 1995. "The 'National System of Innovation' in Historical Perspective," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 5-24, February.
  2. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521282437 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Dunning, John H., 2000. "The eclectic paradigm as an envelope for economic and business theories of MNE activity," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 163-190, April.
  4. Sachs, Jeffrey D. & Warner, Andrew M., 2001. "The curse of natural resources," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 827-838, May.
  5. Justin Barnes & Raphael Kaplinsky, 2000. "Globalization and the Death of the Local Firm? The Automobile Components Sector in South Africa," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(9), pages 797-812.
  6. Gavin Wright & Jesse Czelusta, 2004. "WHY ECONOMIES SLOW: The Myth of the Resource Curse," Challenge, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 47(2), pages 6-38, March.
  7. Xing, Yuqing & Detert, Neal, 2010. "How the iPhone Widens the United States Trade Deficit with the People's Republic of China," ADBI Working Papers 257, Asian Development Bank Institute.
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