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Modeling green growth and resource efficiency: new results

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  • Bernd Meyer
  • Mark Meyer
  • Martin Distelkamp

Abstract

Green growth is an environmental policy strategy that aims at an absolute decoupling between economic growth and resource consumption. As far as the applied policy measures focus on direct enhancements of economy-wide resource efficiency levels, their overall achievements might however be weakened by their induced rebound effects. This paper seeks to investigate the nature and significance of such trade-off interrelationships with regards to material efficiency improvements within the German economy. To this, we present the outcomes of individual policy simulations by means of the PANTA RHEI model. Taxes, information, and regulation activities are considered as policy instruments. Our overall empirical findings cannot falsify the green growth paradigm as the observed magnitude of economy-wide rebound effects appears unable to inhibit future absolute decoupling trends. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Bernd Meyer & Mark Meyer & Martin Distelkamp, 2012. "Modeling green growth and resource efficiency: new results," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 24(2), pages 145-154, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:minecn:v:24:y:2012:i:2:p:145-154
    DOI: 10.1007/s13563-011-0008-3
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    1. Guerra, Ana-Isabel & Sancho, Ferran, 2010. "Rethinking economy-wide rebound measures: An unbiased proposal," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 6684-6694, November.
    2. Meyer, Bernd & Distelkamp, Martin & Wolter, Marc Ingo, 2007. "Material efficiency and economic-environmental sustainability. Results of simulations for Germany with the model PANTA RHEI," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 192-200, June.
    3. Binswanger, Mathias, 2001. "Technological progress and sustainable development: what about the rebound effect?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 119-132, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Florian Flachenecker, 2015. "Sustainability, Resource Efficiency and Competitiveness. An Assessment of Resource Efficiency Policies in the European Union," Bruges European Economic Research Papers 32, European Economic Studies Department, College of Europe.
    2. Lutz, Christian & Lindenberger, Dietmar & Schlesinger, Michael & Tode, Christian, 2014. "Energy Reference Forecast and Energy Policy Targets for Germany," Die Unternehmung - Swiss Journal of Business Research and Practice, Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG, vol. 68(3), pages 154-163.
    3. Markus Flaute & Anett Großmann & Christian Lutz & Anne Nieters, 2017. "Macroeconomic Effects of Prosumer Households in Germany," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 146-155.
    4. Paul Welfens & Christian Lutz, 2012. "Green ICT dynamics: key issues and findings for Germany," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 24(2), pages 155-163, June.
    5. Dr. Christian Lutz & Dr. Markus Flaute & Dr. Ulrike Lehr & Dr. Kirsten Svenja Wiebe, 2015. "Economic impacts of renewable power generation technologies and the role of endogenous technological change," GWS Discussion Paper Series 15-9, GWS - Institute of Economic Structures Research.
    6. Pfaff, Matthias & Sartorius, Christian, 2015. "Economy-wide rebound effects for non-energetic raw materials," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 132-139.
    7. Hafner, Sarah & Anger-Kraavi, Annela & Monasterolo, Irene & Jones, Aled, 2020. "Emergence of New Economics Energy Transition Models: A Review," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 177(C).
    8. Sartorius, Christian, 2015. "Positive employment effects of increasing material efficiency," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S14/2015, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    9. Zauresh Atakhanova & Peter Howie, 2020. "Metal intensity of use in the era of global value chains," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 33(1), pages 101-113, July.
    10. Anne Nieters & Dr. Thomas Drosdowski & Dr. Ulrike Lehr, 2015. "Do extreme weather events damage the German economy?," GWS Discussion Paper Series 15-2, GWS - Institute of Economic Structures Research.
    11. Julian Marius Müller & Daniel Kiel & Kai-Ingo Voigt, 2018. "What Drives the Implementation of Industry 4.0? The Role of Opportunities and Challenges in the Context of Sustainability," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(1), pages 1-24, January.
    12. Rögnvaldur Hannesson, 2021. "Are We Seeing Dematerialization of World GDP?," Biophysical Economics and Resource Quality, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 1-6, June.
    13. Lehr, Ulrike & Lutz, Christian & Edler, Dietmar, 2012. "Green jobs? Economic impacts of renewable energy in Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 358-364.
    14. Skelton, Alexandra C.H. & Paroussos, Leonidas & Allwood, Julian M., 2020. "Comparing energy and material efficiency rebound effects: an exploration of scenarios in the GEM-E3 macroeconomic model," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 173(C).
    15. Harald U. Sverdrup & Deniz Koca & Peter Schlyter, 2017. "A Simple System Dynamics Model for the Global Production Rate of Sand, Gravel, Crushed Rock and Stone, Market Prices and Long-Term Supply Embedded into the WORLD6 Model," Biophysical Economics and Resource Quality, Springer, vol. 2(2), pages 1-20, June.
    16. Dominik Wiedenhofer & Marina Fischer-Kowalski, 2015. "Achieving Absolute Decoupling? Comparing Biophysical Scenarios and Macro-economic Modelling Results. WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 86," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 57895, December.
    17. Dr. Christian Lutz & Roland Zieschank & Dr. Thomas Drosdowski, 2015. "Measuring transformation towards a green economy in Germany," GWS Discussion Paper Series 15-3, GWS - Institute of Economic Structures Research.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Green growth; Economic-environmental modeling; Resource policy modeling; Resource efficiency; Rebound effect; Recycling; C51; C54; C63; C67; Q31; Q32; Q38;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C54 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Quantitative Policy Modeling
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • Q31 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • Q38 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy (includes OPEC Policy)

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