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Displacement and household adaptation: insured by the spouse or the state?

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  • Inés Hardoy
  • Pål Schøne

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Abstract

We investigate the added worker effect in a setting where female labour supply is high and the welfare state is generous. We trace couples’ labour supply and income development following the husband’s job displacement. We find no support for the added worker effect for the full sample of households. However, the added worker effect seems to be at work for subsamples characterised by households where the spouses are not working in the same industry and where the wife did not work full time pre-displacement. When using a measure of total household income, which includes public transfers, we find that the negative income impact of displacement is reduced by approximately 60 to 70 % when we also adjust for lower tax payments. Results suggest that income loss due to displacement is mitigated more by social welfare payments than by labour supply responses of the spouse. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Inés Hardoy & Pål Schøne, 2014. "Displacement and household adaptation: insured by the spouse or the state?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(3), pages 683-703, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:27:y:2014:i:3:p:683-703
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-013-0469-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Julio Guzman, 2014. "Social Protection and Private Coping Strategies During Recessions: Evidence from Chile," Working Papers wp_041, Adolfo Ibáñez University, School of Government.
    2. Wiljan van den Berge, 2019. "Automatic Reaction – What Happens to Workers at Firms that Automate?," CPB Discussion Paper 390.rdf, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    3. Deborah Goldschmidt & Wolfram Klosterhuber & Johannes F Schmieder, 2017. "Identifying couples in administrative data [Identifizierung von Ehepaaren in Administrativen Daten]," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 50(1), pages 29-43, August.
    4. Fevang, Elisabeth & Hardoy, Inés & Røed, Knut, 2013. "Getting Disabled Workers Back to Work: How Important Are Economic Incentives?," IZA Discussion Papers 7137, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Daniel Fackler & Eva Weigt, 2020. "Who Buffers Income Losses after Job Displacement? The Role of Alternative Income Sources, the Family, and the State," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 34(3), pages 239-276, September.
    6. Fackler, Daniel & Hank, Eva, 2016. "Who buffers income losses after job displacement? The role of alternative income sources, the family, and the state," IWH Discussion Papers 28/2016, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    7. Bredtmann, Julia & Otten, Sebastian & Rulff, Christian, 2014. "Husband's Unemployment and Wife's Labor Supply – The Added Worker Effect across Europe," Ruhr Economic Papers 484, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    8. Daniel Fackler & Eva Hank, 2016. "Who Buffers Income Losses after Job Displacement? The Role of Alternative Income Sources, the Family, and the State," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 863, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Aysit Tansel & Zeynel Abidin Ozdemir, 2018. "Unemployment invariance hypothesis, added and discouraged worker effects in Canada," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(7), pages 929-936, October.
    10. Carina Keldenich & Andreas Knabe, 2018. "Women’s Labor Market Responses to their Partners’ Unemployment and Low-Pay Employment," CESifo Working Paper Series 7377, CESifo.
    11. Laurine Martinoty, 2014. "Intra-Household Coping Mechanisms in Hard Times: the Added Worker Effect in the 2001 Argentine Economic Crisis," Post-Print halshs-01076566, HAL.
    12. Martin Halla & Julia Schmieder & Andrea Weber, 2020. "Job Displacement, Family Dynamics, and Spousal Labor Supply," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 253-287, October.
    13. Hank, Eva & Fackler, Daniel, 2017. "Who buffers income losses after job displacement? The role of alternative income sources, the family, and the state," VfS Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168098, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    14. Aysit Tansel & Zeynel Abidin Ozdemir, 2016. "Unemployment Invariance Hypothesis, Added and Discouraged Worker Effects in Canada?," ERC Working Papers 1717, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Dec 2017.
    15. repec:zbw:rwirep:0484 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Richard Upward & Peter Wright, 2015. "Don’t Look Down: New Evidence on Job Loss in a Flexible Labour Market," Discussion Papers 2015-10, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    17. Schone, Pal & Strom, Marte, 2019. "International Labor Market Competition and Spousal Labor Supply Responses," IZA Discussion Papers 12857, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    18. Richard Upward & Peter W. Wright, 2019. "Don't Look Down: The Consequences of Job Loss in a Flexible Labour Market," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 86(341), pages 166-200, January.
    19. Wiljan van den Berge, 2019. "Automatic Reaction – What Happens to Workers at Firms that Automate?," CPB Discussion Paper 390, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour supply; Added worker effect; Displacement; Welfare benefits; J15; J63; J65;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings

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