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On the geography of conventions

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  • Andreas Blume
  • Ted Temzelides

Abstract

We study a model in which heterogenous boundedly rational agents interact locally in order to play a coordination game. Agents differ in their mobility with mobile agents being able to relocate within a country. The model yields the following predictions: (1) mobile agents always benefit from increased mobility, (2) immobile agents benefit from increased mobility at low levels of mobility, (3) immobile agents lose from increased mobility at high levels of mobility, (4) there is an optimal ``country size,'' (5) ``income inequality'' is weakly increasing in mobility, (6) if there are arbitrarily small payoff differences between two countries, opening borders causes a ``brain drain'' effect; in the long run, all mobile agents reside in the favored (former) country and efficiency is attained only in that country.
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Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Blume & Ted Temzelides, 2003. "On the geography of conventions," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 22(4), pages 863-873, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joecth:v:22:y:2003:i:4:p:863-873
    DOI: 10.1007/s00199-002-0350-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fudenberg, Drew & Levine, David, 1998. "Learning in games," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-5), pages 631-639, May.
    2. Ellison, Glenn, 1993. "Learning, Local Interaction, and Coordination," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(5), pages 1047-1071, September.
    3. Drew Fudenberg & David K. Levine, 1998. "The Theory of Learning in Games," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262061945, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ge Jiang & Simon Weidenholzer, 2017. "Local interactions under switching costs," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 64(3), pages 571-588, October.
    2. Matros, Alexander & Moser, Scott, 2015. "Coordination in a changing environment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 64-84.
    3. Fei Shi, 2015. "Long-run technology choice with endogenous local capacity," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 59(2), pages 377-399, June.
    4. Simon Weidenholzer, 2010. "Coordination Games and Local Interactions: A Survey of the Game Theoretic Literature," Games, MDPI, vol. 1(4), pages 1-35, November.
    5. Zhiwei Cui, 2019. "Matching, Imitation, and Coordination in Networks," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 47-67, March.
    6. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli, 2020. "The evolution of conventions under condition-dependent mistakes," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 69(2), pages 497-521, March.
    7. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli, 2018. "Social coordination with locally observable types," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 65(4), pages 975-1009, June.
    8. Bilancini, Ennio & Boncinelli, Leonardo, 2022. "The evolution of conventions in the presence of social competition," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 50-57.
    9. Peski, Marcin, 2010. "Generalized risk-dominance and asymmetric dynamics," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 145(1), pages 216-248, January.
    10. Pin, Paolo & Weidenholzer, Elke & Weidenholzer, Simon, 2017. "Constrained mobility and the evolution of efficient outcomes," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 165-175.

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