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Was Life Better in the “Good Old Days”? Intertemporal Judgments of Life Satisfaction


  • Michael Hagerty



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Suggested Citation

  • Michael Hagerty, 2003. "Was Life Better in the “Good Old Days”? Intertemporal Judgments of Life Satisfaction," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 4(2), pages 115-139, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jhappi:v:4:y:2003:i:2:p:115-139 DOI: 10.1023/A:1024406800912

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Oswald, Andrew J, 1997. "Happiness and Economic Performance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(445), pages 1815-1831, November.
    2. Bruno S. Frey & Alois Stutzer, 2002. "What Can Economists Learn from Happiness Research?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 402-435, June.
    3. Easterlin, Richard A, 2001. "Income and Happiness: Towards an Unified Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(473), pages 465-484, July.
    4. Easterlin, Richard A., 1995. "Will raising the incomes of all increase the happiness of all?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 35-47, June.
    5. Richard Eckersley, 2000. "The Mixed Blessings of Material Progress: Diminishing Returns in the Pursuit of Happiness," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 267-292, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Perez Truglia, Ricardo Nicolas & Bottan, Nicolas Luis, 2008. "Deconstructing the Hedonic Treadmill: Is Happiness Autoregressive?," MPRA Paper 20340, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Cardoso, Rodrigo V. & Meijers, Evert J. & van Ham, Maarten & Burger, Martijn J. & de Vos, Duco, 2017. "The City as a Self-Help Book: The Psychology of Urban Promises," IZA Discussion Papers 10693, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Frijters, Paul & Liu, Amy Y.C. & Meng, Xin, 2012. "Are optimistic expectations keeping the Chinese happy?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 159-171.
    4. Chau-kiu Cheung & Kwok Leung, 2010. "Ways that Social Change Predicts Personal Quality of Life," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 96(3), pages 459-477, May.
    5. Débora Godoy-Izquierdo & Raquel Lara Moreno & María Vázquez Pérez & Francisco Araque Serrano & Juan Godoy García, 2013. "Correlates of Happiness Among Older Spanish Institutionalised and Non-Institutionalised Adults," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 389-414, April.


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