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Marital status and the decision to file for personal bankruptcy: A duration model approach


  • Jonathan Fisher



This paper examines how changes in marital status and the length of time in current marital status affect the probability of filing for personal bankruptcy. The results show that the probability of filing differs significantly by marital status. Divorced households are more likely to file in the first two years after divorce while married households and single households file later in their tenure. A further contribution of this paper is that it represents the first use of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) to examine whether there is duration dependence in personal bankruptcy. Copyright Academy of Economics and Finance 2004

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Fisher, 2004. "Marital status and the decision to file for personal bankruptcy: A duration model approach," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 28(3), pages 348-360, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jecfin:v:28:y:2004:i:3:p:348-360
    DOI: 10.1007/BF02751737

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Baker, George P & Jensen, Michael C & Murphy, Kevin J, 1988. " Compensation and Incentives: Practice vs. Theory," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(3), pages 593-616, July.
    2. Lucian Arye Bebchuk & Jesse M. Fried, 2003. "Executive Compensation as an Agency Problem," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 71-92, Summer.
    3. Hallock, Kevin F., 1997. "Reciprocally Interlocking Boards of Directors and Executive Compensation," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(03), pages 331-344, September.
    4. Bebchuk, Lucian A. & Fried, Jesse M., 2003. "Executive Compensation as an Agency Problem," Berkeley Olin Program in Law & Economics, Working Paper Series qt81q3136r, Berkeley Olin Program in Law & Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Fisher & Angela Lyons, 2006. "Till Debt do us Part: A Model of Divorce and Personal Bankruptcy," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 35-52, March.
    2. Thomas A. Garrett, 2007. "The rise in personal bankruptcies: the Eighth Federal Reserve District and beyond," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 15-38.

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