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Income-related health inequality in Belgium: a longitudinal perspective

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  • Ann Lecluyse

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Ann Lecluyse, 2007. "Income-related health inequality in Belgium: a longitudinal perspective," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 8(3), pages 237-243, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:8:y:2007:i:3:p:237-243
    DOI: 10.1007/s10198-006-0024-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andrew M. Jones & Angel López Nicolás, 2004. "Measurement and explanation of socioeconomic inequality in health with longitudinal data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 1015-1030.
    2. Wagstaff, Adam & van Doorslaer, Eddy & Watanabe, Naoko, 2003. "On decomposing the causes of health sector inequalities with an application to malnutrition inequalities in Vietnam," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 207-223, January.
    3. Ann Lecluyse & Irina Cleemput, 2006. "Making health continuous: implications of different methods on the measurement of inequality," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(1), pages 99-104.
    4. Van Ourti, Tom, 2003. "Socio-economic inequality in ill-health amongst the elderly: Should one use current or permanent income?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 219-241, March.
    5. Benjamins, Maureen Reindl & Hummer, Robert A. & Eberstein, Isaac W. & Nam, Charles B., 2004. "Self-reported health and adult mortality risk: An analysis of cause-specific mortality," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(6), pages 1297-1306, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tubeuf, S, 2008. "Income-related inequalities in self-assessed health: comparisons of alternative measurements of health," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 08/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice & Paul Contoyannis, 2012. "The Dynamics of Health," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
      • Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice & Paul Contoyannis, 2006. "The Dynamics of Health," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Ziebarth, Nicolas R. & Frick, Joachim R., 2010. "Revisiting the Income-Health Nexus: The Importance of Choosing the "Right" Indicator," IZA Discussion Papers 4787, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Joachim Frick & Nicolas Ziebarth, 2013. "Welfare-related health inequality: does the choice of measure matter?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 14(3), pages 431-442, June.
    5. Clougherty, Jane Ellen & Eisen, Ellen A. & Slade, Martin D. & Kawachi, Ichiro & Cullen, Mark R., 2009. "Workplace status and risk of hypertension among hourly and salaried aluminum manufacturing employees," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 304-313, January.
    6. Costa-Font, Joan & Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina, 2012. "Measuring inequalities in health: What do we know? What do we need to know?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 195-206.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health; Inequality; Socio-economic status; Income; Longitudinal data; Belgium; D30; D63; I10; I12;

    JEL classification:

    • D30 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - General
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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