IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/eujhec/v4y2003i3p176-183.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Scale of reference bias and the evolution of health

Author

Listed:
  • Wim Groot

    ()

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Wim Groot, 2003. "Scale of reference bias and the evolution of health," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 4(3), pages 176-183, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:4:y:2003:i:3:p:176-183 DOI: 10.1007/s10198-003-0196-z
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10198-003-0196-z
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Groot, Wim, 2000. "Adaptation and scale of reference bias in self-assessments of quality of life," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 403-420, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Liam Delaney & Pat Wall & Fearghal O'hAodha, 2007. "Social Capital & Self-Rated Health in the Republic of Ireland. Evidence from the European Social Survey," Working Papers 200707, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    2. Maike Schulz, 2012. "Messartefakte bei der Erfassung der Gesundheit von Migranten in Deutschland: zur interkulturellen Äquivalenz des SF-12-Fragebogen im Sozio-oekonomischen Panel (SOEP)," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 447, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. repec:ucn:wpaper:10197/576 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Gunasekara, Fiona Imlach & Carter, Kristie & Blakely, Tony, 2012. "Comparing self-rated health and self-assessed change in health in a longitudinal survey: Which is more valid?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(7), pages 1117-1124.
    5. Reto Odermatt & Alois Stutzer, 2015. "(Mis-)Predicted Subjective Well-Being Following Life Events," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 787, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    6. Liam Delaney & Patrick G. Wall & Fearghal O'hAodha, 2007. "Social capital and self-rated health in the Republic of Ireland : evidence from the European Social Survey," Open Access publications 10197/574, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Subjective health; Scale of reference bias;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:4:y:2003:i:3:p:176-183. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.