IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/socmed/v48y1999i11p1517-1530.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Social comparison as a mediator of response shift

Author

Listed:
  • Gibbons, F. X.

Abstract

Previous research in the domain of social comparison theory has suggested that the same factors that have been hypothesized as antecedents to response shift, primarily significant life events, also prompt an increase in interest in social comparison. Based on this research, it is suggested that social comparison, or more specifically, change in social comparison, is a mediator of the relation between significant life events and the change in self-perspective - or response shift -- that they often produce. Evidence supporting this claim is reviewed and new data are presented. Finally, the implications of this mediational relation, including those relevant to the design of interventions, are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Gibbons, F. X., 1999. "Social comparison as a mediator of response shift," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 48(11), pages 1517-1530, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:48:y:1999:i:11:p:1517-1530
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277-9536(99)00046-5
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Damschroder, Laura J. & Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. & Ubel, Peter A., 2005. "The impact of considering adaptation in health state valuation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 267-277, July.
    2. Jin-Tan Liu & Meng-Wen Tsou & James K. Hammitt, 2007. "Health Information and Subjective Survival Probability: Evidence from Taiwan," Journal of Risk Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 149-175, March.
    3. Maes, Kenneth C. & Hadley, Craig & Tesfaye, Fikru & Shifferaw, Selamawit, 2010. "Food insecurity and mental health: Surprising trends among community health volunteers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia during the 2008 food crisis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(9), pages 1450-1457, May.
    4. Winter, Laraine & Parker, Barbara, 2007. "Current health and preferences for life-prolonging treatments: An application of prospect theory to end-of-life decision making," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(8), pages 1695-1707, October.
    5. Dibb, Bridget & Yardley, Lucy, 2006. "How does social comparison within a self-help group influence adjustment to chronic illness? A longitudinal study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(6), pages 1602-1613, September.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:48:y:1999:i:11:p:1517-1530. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.