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Future unrelated medical costs need to be considered in cost effectiveness analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Pieter Baal

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

  • Alec Morton

    (University of Strathclyde)

  • David Meltzer

    (University of Chicago)

  • Werner Brouwer

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

Abstract

New medical technologies that prolong life result in additional health care use in life years gained. Some of these costs in life years gained are considered to be related to the intervention while other costs are considered unrelated. Here, we argue that ignoring these so-called future medical costs in cost effectiveness analysis is contrary to common sense, results in lost health and fails to inform decision makers for whom cost effectiveness is supposed to serve.

Suggested Citation

  • Pieter Baal & Alec Morton & David Meltzer & Werner Brouwer, 2019. "Future unrelated medical costs need to be considered in cost effectiveness analysis," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 20(1), pages 1-5, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:20:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s10198-018-0976-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s10198-018-0976-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Helen Dakin & Nancy Devlin & Yan Feng & Nigel Rice & Phill O'Neill & David Parkin, 2015. "The Influence of Cost‐Effectiveness and Other Factors on Nice Decisions," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(10), pages 1256-1271, October.
    2. Karl Claxton & Mark Sculpher & Stephen Palmer & Anthony J Culyer, 2015. "Causes For Concern: Is Nice Failing To Uphold Its Responsibilities To All Nhs Patients?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 1-7, January.
    3. Pieter van Baal & David Meltzer & Werner Brouwer, 2016. "Future Costs, Fixed Healthcare Budgets, and the Decision Rules of Cost‐Effectiveness Analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(2), pages 237-248, February.
    4. Joseph P. Newhouse, 1992. "Medical Care Costs: How Much Welfare Loss?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 3-21, Summer.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Brendan Collins’s journal round-up for 18th March 2019
      by Bren Collins in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2019-03-18 12:00:58

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    Cited by:

    1. Mark P. Connolly & Nikolaos Kotsopoulos & Aomesh Bhatt & Maarten J. Postma, 0. "Sustainability of public finances: inclusion of unrelated medical cost only part of the story," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 0, pages 1-3.
    2. Mark P. Connolly & Nikolaos Kotsopoulos & Aomesh Bhatt & Maarten J. Postma, 2019. "Sustainability of public finances: inclusion of unrelated medical cost only part of the story," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 20(8), pages 1281-1282, November.

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