IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/eujhec/v17y2016i1p87-98.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The economic impact of chronic pain: a nationwide population-based cost-of-illness study in Portugal

Author

Listed:
  • Luís Azevedo

    ()

  • Altamiro Costa-Pereira
  • Liliane Mendonça
  • Cláudia Dias
  • José Castro-Lopes

Abstract

In addition to its high frequency and relevant individual and social impact, chronic pain (CP) has been shown to be a major contributor to increased healthcare utilisation, reduced labour productivity, and consequently large direct and indirect costs. In the context of a larger nationwide study, we aimed to assess the total annual direct and indirect costs associated with CP in Portugal. A population-based study was conducted in a representative sample of the Portuguese adult population. The 5,094 participants were selected using random digit dialling and contacted by computer-assisted telephone interviews. Questionnaires included the brief pain inventory and pain disability index. Estimates were adequately weighted for the population. From all CP subjects identified, a subsample (n = 562) accepted to participate in this economic study. Mean total annualised costs per CP subject of €1,883.30 were observed, amounting to €4,611.69 million nationally, with 42.7 % direct and 57.3 % indirect costs, and corresponding to 2.71 % of the Portuguese annual GDP in 2010. Only socio-demographic variables were significantly and independently associated with CP costs, and not CP severity, raising the possibility of existing inequalities in the distribution of healthcare in Portugal. The high economic impact of CP in Portugal was comprehensively demonstrated. Given the high indirect costs observed, restricting healthcare services is not a rational response to these high societal costs; instead improving the quality of CP prevention and management is recommended. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Suggested Citation

  • Luís Azevedo & Altamiro Costa-Pereira & Liliane Mendonça & Cláudia Dias & José Castro-Lopes, 2016. "The economic impact of chronic pain: a nationwide population-based cost-of-illness study in Portugal," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(1), pages 87-98, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:17:y:2016:i:1:p:87-98
    DOI: 10.1007/s10198-014-0659-4
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10198-014-0659-4
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christian Kronborg & Gitte Handberg & Flemming Axelsen, 2009. "Health care costs, work productivity and activity impairment in non-malignant chronic pain patients," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 10(1), pages 5-13, February.
    2. Buntin, Melinda Beeuwkes & Zaslavsky, Alan M., 2004. "Too much ado about two-part models and transformation?: Comparing methods of modeling Medicare expenditures," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 525-542, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Guido Migliaccio, 2019. "Disabled People in the Stakeholder Theory: a Literature Analysis," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 10(4), pages 1657-1678, December.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Luís Filipe Azevedo & Altamiro Costa-Pereira & Liliane Mendonça & Cláudia Camila Dias & José M. Castro-Lopes, 2016. "The economic impact of chronic pain: a nationwide population-based cost-of-illness study in Portugal," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(1), pages 87-98, January.
    2. Rémi Lardellier & Renaud Legal & Denis Raynaud & Guillaume Vidal, 2011. "Un outil pour l’étude des dépenses de santé et des « restes à charge » des ménages : le modèle Omar," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 450(1), pages 47-77.
    3. Adam Wagstaff & Magnus Lindelow, 2014. "Are Health Shocks Different? Evidence From A Multishock Survey In Laos," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(6), pages 706-718, June.
    4. Ermagun, Alireza & Stathopoulos, Amanda, 2018. "To bid or not to bid: An empirical study of the supply determinants of crowd-shipping," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 468-483.
    5. Jones, A.M, 2010. "Models For Health Care," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/01, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Slawa Rokicki & Mark E. McGovern, 2020. "Heterogeneity in Early Life Investments: A Longitudinal Analysis of Children's Time Use," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 66(3), pages 647-676, September.
    7. Toni Mora & Joan Gil & Antoni Sicras-Mainar, 2012. "The Influence of BMI, Obesity and Overweight on Medical Costs: A Panel Data Approach," Working Papers 2012-08, FEDEA.
    8. Crystal Blyler & Melissa Azur & Bonnie O'Day & Priyanka Anand & Allison Barrett & Kavita Choudhry & Kara Contreary & Sarah Croake & Molly Crofton & Noelle Denny-Brown & Brian Johnston & Jasmine Little, "undated". "Medicaid Emergency Psychiatric Services Demonstration Evaluation: Volume 1," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 68136f5dda6f4dfe90a630202, Mathematica Policy Research.
    9. Keane, Michael & Stavrunova, Olena, 2016. "Adverse selection, moral hazard and the demand for Medigap insurance," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 190(1), pages 62-78.
    10. Vecino-Ortiz, Andrés Ignacio, 2008. "Determinants of demand for antenatal care in Colombia," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(2-3), pages 363-372, May.
    11. Jonathan Gruber & Robin McKnight, 2016. "Controlling Health Care Costs through Limited Network Insurance Plans: Evidence from Massachusetts State Employees," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 219-250, May.
    12. Toni Mora & Joan Gil & Antoni Sicras-Mainar, 2015. "The influence of obesity and overweight on medical costs: a panel data perspective," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(2), pages 161-173, March.
    13. Chee‐Ruey Hsieh & Xuezheng Qin, 2018. "Depression hurts, depression costs: The medical spending attributable to depression and depressive symptoms in China," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(3), pages 525-544, March.
    14. K. P. M. Winssen & R. C. Kleef & W. P. M. M. Ven, 2018. "Can premium differentiation counteract adverse selection in the Dutch supplementary health insurance? A simulation study," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 19(5), pages 757-768, June.
    15. Wagstaff, Adam & Lindelow, Magnus, 2008. "Can insurance increase financial risk?: The curious case of health insurance in China," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 990-1005, July.
    16. Caitlin Carroll & Michael Chernew & A. Mark Fendrick & Joe Thompson & Sherri Rose, 2017. "Effects of Episode-Based Payment on Health Care Spending and Utilization: Evidence from Perinatal Care in Arkansas," NBER Working Papers 23926, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Dunn, Abe, 2016. "Health insurance and the demand for medical care: Instrumental variable estimates using health insurer claims data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 74-88.
    18. Grant Miller, 2005. "Contraception as Development? New Evidence from Family Planning in Colombia," CID Working Papers 9, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    19. Amitabh Chandra & Jonathan Gruber & Robin McKnight, 2012. "The Impact of Patient Cost-Sharing on the Poor: Evidence from Massachusetts," NBER Working Papers 18023, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Baji, Petra & Rubashkin, Nicholas & Szebik, Imre & Stoll, Kathrin & Vedam, Saraswathi, 2017. "Informal cash payments for birth in Hungary: Are women paying to secure a known provider, respect, or quality of care?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 189(C), pages 86-95.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Chronic pain; Costs; Productivity; Cost of illness; Economic impact; I10; I14; I18;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:17:y:2016:i:1:p:87-98. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.