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Adolescents alcohol-use and economic conditions: a multilevel analysis of data from a period with big economic changes

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  • Mikael Svensson

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  • Curt Hagquist

Abstract

This paper examines how the unemployment rate is related to adolescent alcohol use during a time period characterized by big societal changes using repeated cross-sectional adolescent survey data from a Swedish region, collected in 1988, 1991, 1995, 1998, 2002 and 2005. Individual level alcohol use is connected to local level unemployment rate to estimate the relationship using multilevel modeling. The results show that the unemployment rate is negatively associated with adolescents alcohol use. When the unemployment rate increases, more adolescents, mainly girls, do not drink at all. Regular drinking (2/month or more) is, on the other hand, unrelated to the unemployment rate. This implies that we may se decreases in adolescent alcohol use in the now expected real economic crisis with increasing unemployment.
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Suggested Citation

  • Mikael Svensson & Curt Hagquist, 2010. "Adolescents alcohol-use and economic conditions: a multilevel analysis of data from a period with big economic changes," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 11(6), pages 533-541, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:11:y:2010:i:6:p:533-541 DOI: 10.1007/s10198-009-0209-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Svensson, Mikael & Hagquist, Curt, 2009. "Adolescent Alcohol- And Illicit Drug-Use In First And Second Generation Immigrants In Sweden," Working Papers 2009:8, Örebro University, School of Business.
    2. Thomas S. Dee, 2001. "Alcohol abuse and economic conditions: Evidence from repeated cross-sections of individual-level data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(3), pages 257-270.
    3. Ruhm, Christopher J. & Black, William E., 2002. "Does drinking really decrease in bad times?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 659-678, July.
    4. Ruhm, Christopher J., 1995. "Economic conditions and alcohol problems," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 583-603, December.
    5. Jeremy Arkes, 2007. "Does the economy affect teenage substance use?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 19-36.
    6. Sophia Rabe-Hesketh & Anders Skrondal, 2012. "Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, 3rd Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, edition 3, number mimus2, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mekonnen, Dawit & Hira, Channa & Claudia, Ringler, "undated". "Where to invest in the Indus Basin Irrigation System in Pakistan to improve land and water productivity? Insights from a hierarchical model," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235977, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Alcohol use; Unemployment rate; Multilevel methods; Sweden; E32; I12;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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