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The Effect of Disasters on Migration Destinations: Evidence from Hurricane Katrina

Author

Listed:
  • Jonathan Eyer

    () (University of Southern California)

  • Robert Dinterman

    (The Ohio State University)

  • Noah Miller

    (University of Southern California)

  • Adam Rose

    (University of Southern California)

Abstract

Abstract While post-disaster migration can move vulnerable populations from dangerous regions to relatively safe ones, little is known about decisions that migrants use to select new homes. We develop an econometric model of migrant flows to examine the characteristics of the destinations that attracted migrants leaving the New Orleans area following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 relative to migration behaviors in other years. We find an increased flow of migrants to large, nearby counties with a mixed effect of economic variables on migration. We find that counties that had experienced fewer disasters received a greater proportion of total migrants in 2005, but there was an overall increase in migration flow to disaster-prone regions as well.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Eyer & Robert Dinterman & Noah Miller & Adam Rose, 2018. "The Effect of Disasters on Migration Destinations: Evidence from Hurricane Katrina," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 91-106, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ediscc:v:2:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s41885-017-0020-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s41885-017-0020-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Molly Fifer McIntosh, 2008. "Measuring the Labor Market Impacts of Hurricane Katrina Migration: Evidence from Houston, Texas," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 54-57, May.
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    7. Anil Rupasingha & Yongzheng Liu & Mark Partridge, 2015. "Rural Bound: Determinants of Metro to Non-Metro Migration in the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(3), pages 680-700.
    8. Jeffrey Groen & Anne Polivka, 2010. "Going home after Hurricane Katrina: Determinants of return migration and changes in affected areas," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 47(4), pages 821-844, November.
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