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The Effects of Gendered Social Capital on U.S. Migration: A Comparison of Four Latin American Countries

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  • Rochelle Côté

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  • Jessica Jensen
  • Louise Roth
  • Sandra Way

Abstract

This article contributes to understandings of gendered social capital by analyzing the effects of gendered ties on the migration of men and women from four Latin American countries (Mexico, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic) to the United States. The research theorizes the importance of strong and weak ties to men and women in each sending country as a product of the gender equity gap in economic participation (low/high) and incidence of female-led families (low/high). The findings reveal that ties to men increase the odds of migration from countries where gender equity and incidence of female-led families are low, while ties to women are more important for migration from countries where gender equity and female-led families are high. Previous research on migration and social capital details the importance of network ties for providing resources and the role of gender in mediating social capital quality and access to network support. Results reveal that not only are different kinds of ties important to female and male migration, but migrants from different countries look to different sources of social capital for assistance. Copyright Population Association of America 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Rochelle Côté & Jessica Jensen & Louise Roth & Sandra Way, 2015. "The Effects of Gendered Social Capital on U.S. Migration: A Comparison of Four Latin American Countries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(3), pages 989-1015, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:52:y:2015:i:3:p:989-1015
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-015-0396-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Elizabeth Fussell & Douglas Massey, 2004. "The limits to cumulative causation: International migration from Mexican Urban Areas," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(1), pages 151-171, February.
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    8. Sara Curran & Estela Rivero-Fuentes, 2003. "Engendering migrant networks: The case of Mexican migration," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(2), pages 289-307, May.
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    10. Marcela Cerrutti & Douglas Massey, 2001. "On the auspices of female migration from Mexico to the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(2), pages 187-200, May.
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    1. repec:kap:poprpr:v:37:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11113-018-9469-1 is not listed on IDEAS

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