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Declining Return Migration From the United States to Mexico in the Late-2000s Recession: A Research Note

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  • Michael Rendall

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  • Peter Brownell
  • Sarah Kups

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Suggested Citation

  • Michael Rendall & Peter Brownell & Sarah Kups, 2011. "Declining Return Migration From the United States to Mexico in the Late-2000s Recession: A Research Note," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(3), pages 1049-1058, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:48:y:2011:i:3:p:1049-1058
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-011-0049-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jesúús Fernández-Huertas Moraga, 2011. "New Evidence on Emigrant Selection," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(1), pages 72-96, February.
    2. Kenneth Hill & Rebeca Wong, 2005. "Mexico-US Migration: Views from Both Sides of the Border," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 31(1), pages 1-18.
    3. Kenneth M. Johnson & Daniel T. Lichter, 2010. "Growing Diversity among America's Children and Youth: Spatial and Temporal Dimensions," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 36(1), pages 151-176.
    4. Jennifer Hook & Weiwei Zhang, 2011. "Who Stays? Who Goes? Selective Emigration Among the Foreign-Born," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(1), pages 1-24, February.
    5. Stefan Jonsson & Michael Rendall, 2004. "The fertility contribution of Mexican immigration to the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(1), pages 129-150, February.
    6. David Lindstrom, 1996. "Economic opportunity in mexico and return migration from the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(3), pages 357-374, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Erin Hamilton & Robin Savinar, 2015. "Two Sources of Error in Data on Migration From Mexico to the United States in Mexican Household-Based Surveys," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(4), pages 1345-1355, August.
    2. Fatma MABROUK, 2013. "À la recherche d’une typologie des migrants de retour : le cas des pays du Maghreb," Cahiers du GREThA 2013-06, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    3. Schmeer, Kammi K., 2013. "Family structure and child anemia in Mexico," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 16-23.
    4. Sharron Xuanren Wang & Arthur Sakamoto, 2016. "Did the Great Recession Downsize Immigrants and Native-Born Americans Differently? Unemployment Differentials by Nativity, Race and Gender from 2007 to 2013 in the U.S," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(3), pages 1-14, September.
    5. Peter B. Brownell & Michael S. Rendall, 2014. "Previous Migration Experience and Legal Immigration Status among Intending Mexican Migrants to the United States," Working Papers wp304, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    6. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Lozano, Fernando A., 2017. "Interstate Mobility Patterns of Likely Unauthorized Immigrants: Evidence from Arizona," IZA Discussion Papers 10685, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Jennifer Glick & Scott T. Yabiku, 2016. "Migrant children and migrants' children," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(8), pages 201-228, July.
    8. Erika Arenas & Noreen Goldman & Anne Pebley & Graciela Teruel, 2015. "Return Migration to Mexico: Does Health Matter?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(6), pages 1853-1868, December.
    9. Michael S. Rendall & Susan W. Parker, 2014. "Two Decades of Negative Educational Selectivity of Mexican Migrants to the United States," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 40(3), pages 421-446, September.
    10. Alma Vega & Noli Brazil, 2015. "A multistate life table approach to understanding return and reentry migration between Mexico and the United States during later life," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(43), pages 1211-1240, December.
    11. Orrenius, Pia M. & Zavodny, Madeline, 2017. "Unauthorized Mexican Workers in the United States: Recent Inflows and Possible Future Scenarios," Working Papers 1701, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    12. Biavaschi, Costanza, 2013. "Fifty Years of Compositional Changes in U.S. Out-Migration, 1908-1957," IZA Discussion Papers 7258, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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