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A Tour de Force in Understanding Intergroup Inequality: An Introduction to Stratification Economics

Author

Listed:
  • William Darity

    ()

  • Darrick Hamilton

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  • James Stewart

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Abstract

This special edition of the Review of Black Political Economics provides a contribution to the growing, vital and intellectually rich field of stratification economics. Stratification economics is an emerging field in economics that seeks to expand the boundaries of the analysis of how economists analyze intergroup differences. It examines the competitive, and sometimes collaborative, interplay between members of social groups animated by their collective self-interest to attain or maintain relative group position in a social hierarchy. The collection of articles in this volume span both quantitative and qualitative approaches, geographical distances (Bangladesh, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, Kenya, and the U.S.), types of intergroup disparity (class, race, ethnicity, tribe, gender, and phenotype), and outcomes associated with social stratification (property rights in identity, human capital, financial capital, consumer surplus, health, and labor market outcomes). Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • William Darity & Darrick Hamilton & James Stewart, 2015. "A Tour de Force in Understanding Intergroup Inequality: An Introduction to Stratification Economics," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 42(1), pages 1-6, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:blkpoe:v:42:y:2015:i:1:p:1-6
    DOI: 10.1007/s12114-014-9201-2
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s12114-014-9201-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. William Darity, 2005. "Stratification economics: The role of intergroup inequality," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 29(2), pages 144-153, June.
    2. Becker, Gary S., 1971. "The Economics of Discrimination," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 2, number 9780226041162.
    3. Mason, Patrick, 2007. "Intergenerational mobility and interraical inequality:the return to family values," MPRA Paper 11327, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Arthur H. Goldsmith & Darrick Hamilton & William Darity Jr, 2006. "Shades of Discrimination: Skin Tone and Wages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 242-245, May.
    5. Darity, William Jr. & Mason, Patrick L. & Stewart, James B., 2006. "The economics of identity: The origin and persistence of racial identity norms," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 283-305, July.
    6. James Stewart, 2009. "Be All That You Can Be?: Racial Identity Production in the U.S. Military," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 51-78, March.
    7. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
    8. Karen Gibson & William Darity & Samuel Myers, 1998. "Revisiting Occupational Crowding in the United States: A Preliminary Study," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 73-95.
    9. Arthur H. Goldsmith & Darrick Hamilton & William Darity, Jr, 2007. "From Dark to Light: Skin Color and Wages Among African-Americans," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(4).
    10. Jacqueline Agesa & Darrick Hamilton, 2004. "Competition and Wage Discrimination: The Effects of Interindustry Concentration and Import Penetration," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 85(1), pages 121-135.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2018. "Social Welfare Losses Due to Occupational Segregation by Gender and Race/Ethnicity in the U.S.: Are There Differences across Regions?," Working Papers 1802, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
    2. repec:spr:blkpoe:v:44:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12114-017-9259-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Rachel E. Kranton, 2016. "Identity Economics 2016: Where Do Social Distinctions and Norms Come From?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 405-409, May.
    4. repec:spr:soinre:v:137:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1598-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Hamilton , Darrick & Darity, William A., 2017. "The Political Economy of Education, Financial Literacy, and the Racial Wealth Gap," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 99(1), pages 59-76.

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