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Job and housing tenure and the journey to work

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  • David M. Levinson

    () (1822 Francisco St. #11, Berkeley, CA 94703, USA)

Abstract

Tenure at jobs and houses, along with commuting patterns between home and work, were studied for residents of metropolitan Washington. Two alternative potential outcomes were considered: (1) because moving or switching jobs can be used as an opportunity to reduce commuting duration in an era of rising congestion, those who recently moved or changed jobs should have shorter than average commutes; and (2) because most new residential construction is at the urban fringe, an area of longer commutes, those who recently moved to new homes should have longer commutes. Evaluation of the effect of commuting duration on job and housing tenure suggests that those who move, on average, maintain commute duration rather than having a major increase or decrease. This corroborates the idea that there are offsetting factors, where increases in commute lengths due to suburbanizing residences are counteracted by the correlated process of suburbanizing jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • David M. Levinson, 1997. "Job and housing tenure and the journey to work," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 31(4), pages 451-471.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:31:y:1997:i:4:p:451-471 Note: Received: June 1995 / Accepted in revised form: May 1997
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    Cited by:

    1. Levinson, David & Chang, Elva, 2003. "A model for optimizing electronic toll collection systems," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, pages 293-314.
    2. K. Newbold, 2012. "Migration and regional science: opportunities and challenges in a changing environment," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, pages 451-468.
    3. Clark, William A. V. & Huang, Youqin & Withers, Suzanne, 2003. "Does commuting distance matter?: Commuting tolerance and residential change," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 199-221, March.
    4. Levinson, David & Chang, Elva, 2000. "Deploying Electronic Tolls," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt234972cq, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
    5. Yao Wu & David Levinson, 2005. "The Rational Locator Reexamined," Working Papers 200503, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
    6. Clark, William A.V. & Huang, Youqin, 2003. "Black and White Commuting Behavior in a Large Segregated City: Evidence from Atlanta," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt90t654p2, University of California Transportation Center.
    7. Hazans, Mihails, 2002. "Social returns to commuting in the Baltic states," ERSA conference papers ersa02p232, European Regional Science Association.
    8. repec:eee:trapol:v:59:y:2017:i:c:p:106-115 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Elif Alkay, 2011. "In Depth Analysis of the Home to Work Travel Pattern in the Istanbul Metropolitan Area," ERSA conference papers ersa11p371, European Regional Science Association.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • R42 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government and Private Investment Analysis; Road Maintenance; Transportation Planning
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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