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Telecommunications, cities and technological opportunism

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  • Ilan Salomon

    () (Department of Geography, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel)

Abstract

The advent of telecommunications and the emergence of the 'information age` have given rise to great expectations regarding urban change. The paper examines the assumptions underlying the claims for change and distinguishes between processes which may alter the structure of the city and those which change the functions of cities. In the former, it examines the assumptions underlying the decentralization-concentration hypotheses, suggesting that there is no deterministic effect of telecommunications, and that the structure of cities is largely affected by the persistent need for physical transport. Telecommunications can be used by agents to exercise greater flexibility in location decisions. At the global scale, the emergence of the world cities is facilitated by telecommunications, but only few cities are likely to gain this status. The effects of telecommunications on urban form and function are mostly the result of opportunities seized by individual agents and not by deterministic or naive policy approaches.

Suggested Citation

  • Ilan Salomon, 1996. "Telecommunications, cities and technological opportunism," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 30(1), pages 75-90.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:30:y:1996:i:1:p:75-90
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    Cited by:

    1. Bhat, Chandra R. & Sivakumar, Aruna & Axhausen, Kay W., 2003. "An analysis of the impact of information and communication technologies on non-maintenance shopping activities," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 857-881, December.
    2. McFarlane, Jim A. & Blackwell, Boyd D. & Mounter, Stuart W. & Grant, Bligh J., 2016. "From agriculture to mining: The changing economic base of a rural economy and implications for development," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 56-65.
    3. repec:asg:wpaper:1025 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Maureen Kilkenny, 1995. "Transport Costs and Rural Development," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 95-wp133, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
    5. repec:asg:wpaper:1019 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Elizabeth A. Mack & Tony H. Grubesic, 2009. "Broadband Provision And Firm Location In Ohio: An Exploratory Spatial Analysis," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 100(3), pages 298-315, July.
    7. Harminder Battu & John Finch, 1998. "Integrating knowledge effects into university impact studies. A case study of Aberdeen University," Working Papers 98-08, Department of Economics, University of Aberdeen.
    8. Rachel Guillain & Jean-Marie Huriot, 1998. "Informational interactions and the future of cities," Working Papers hal-01527263, HAL.
    9. Elizabeth A. Mack & Luc Anselin & Tony H. Grubesic, 2011. "The importance of broadband provision to knowledge intensive firm location," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(1), pages 17-35, March.
    10. Elizabeth A. Mack, 2014. "Broadband and knowledge intensive firm clusters: Essential link or auxiliary connection?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(1), pages 3-29, March.
    11. Elizabeth A. Mack, 2015. "Variations in the Broadband-Business Connection across the Urban Hierarchy," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(3), pages 400-423, September.

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