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Ten Productivity Puzzles Facing Researchers

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  • Andrew Sharpe

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Abstract

Puzzles intrigue and motivate researchers and focus research effort, and the productivity area is fortunate in having many unresolved issues. In the second article, Andrew Sharpe of the Centre for the Study of Living Standards puts forward and briefly discusses what he sees as the ten most important productivity puzzles facing researchers in Canada and in other countries. In terms of the international puzzles, he considers the causes of the post-1973 productivity slowdown that affected virtually all industrial countries the grand daddy. He also identifies the post-2000 productivity growth acceleration in the United States, labour productivity levels in a number of European countries that exceed U.S. levels, and the absence of a post-1995 productivity growth acceleration in Europe as developments that are currently not well understood. In terms of productivity puzzles related to Canada, he identifies the considerable difference in labour productivity growth in the non-business sector between Canada and the United States as a topic meriting investigation. He also sees the Canada-U.S. productivity gap and Canada’s relatively low machinery and equipment capital intensity as puzzles meriting in-depth research.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Sharpe, 2004. "Ten Productivity Puzzles Facing Researchers," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 9, pages 15-24, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:sls:ipmsls:v:9:y:2004:2
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    File URL: http://www.csls.ca/ipm/9/sharpe-e.pdf
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    File URL: http://www.csls.ca/ipm/9/sharpe-f.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Someshwar Rao & Jianmin Tang & Weimin Wang, 2002. "The Importance of Skills for Innovation and Productivity," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 4, pages 15-26, Spring.
    2. Andrew Sharpe, 2003. "Why are Americans More Productive than Canadians?," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 6, pages 19-37, Spring.
    3. Someshwar Rao & Ashfaq Ahmad & William Horsman & Phaedra Kaptein-Russell, 2001. "The Importance of Innovation for Productivity," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 2, pages 11-18, Spring.
    4. Someshwar Rao & Jianmin Tang & Weimin Wang, 2004. "Measuring the Canada-U.S. Productivity Gap: Industry Dimensions," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 9, pages 3-14, Fall.
    5. Jeremy Smith, 2004. "Aggregate Labour Productivity Growth in Canada and the United States: Definitions, Trends and Measurement Issues," CSLS Research Reports 2004-04, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adel Ben Youssef & Mounir Dahmani, 2008. "The Impact of ICT on Student Performance in Higher Education: Direct Effects, Indirect Effects and Organisational Change," Post-Print halshs-00936560, HAL.
    2. Adel Ben Youssef & Ludivine Martin & Nessrine Omrani, 2014. "The Complementarities between Information Technologies Use, New Organizational Practices and Employees' Contextual Performance: Evidence from Europe in 2005 and 2010," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 124(4), pages 493-504.
    3. Andrew Sharpe, 2005. "What Explains the Canada-US ICT Investment Gap?," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 11, pages 21-38, Fall.
    4. Andrew Sharpe, 2007. "Three Policies to Improve Productivity Growth in Canada," CSLS Research Reports 2007-05, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    5. Centre for the Study of Living Standards, 2005. "What Explains the Canada-US ICT Investment Intensity Gap?," CSLS Research Reports 2005-06, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour Productivity; Productivity; Productivity Growth; Investment; Information Technology; Information and Communication Technologies; Canada; United States; Acceleration; Productivity Growth Acceleration; Puzzles; Post-1973;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • O51 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - U.S.; Canada
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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