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An Experimental Investigation Into the Application of a Learning-From-Mistakes Approach Among Freshmen Students

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  • Wing Shing Lee

Abstract

To achieve a more effective teaching method, an experimental study using a learning-from-mistakes approach was investigated. A novel approach was adopted from organizational learning literature involving two steps. A first step established the psychological safety notion in students, and the second step called for a student discussion of mistakes they had made. Two classes of freshmen university students studying basic accounting participated in this study. One class was assigned as the treatment group, whereas the other the control group. Students’ performance was repeatedly measured on three separate occasions: pretreatment test, midterm examination, and a final examination as the posttest. Results showed that students from the treatment group outperformed those in the control group on the latter two occasions, whereas both groups scored similarly in the pretreatment test. It is thus concluded that such a suggested approach may ultimately help students learn more effectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Wing Shing Lee, 2020. "An Experimental Investigation Into the Application of a Learning-From-Mistakes Approach Among Freshmen Students," SAGE Open, , vol. 10(2), pages 21582440209, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:sagope:v:10:y:2020:i:2:p:2158244020931938
    DOI: 10.1177/2158244020931938
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Satoshi Sugahara & Gregory Boland, 2010. "The Role of Cultural Factors in the Learning Style Preferences of Accounting Students: A Comparative Study between Japan and Australia," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 235-255.
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    3. Dean Tjosvold & Zi‐you Yu & Chun Hui, 2004. "Team Learning from Mistakes: The Contribution of Cooperative Goals and Problem‐Solving," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(7), pages 1223-1245, November.
    4. Kim, Euisin & Rhee, Mooweon, 2017. "How airlines learn from airline accidents: An empirical study of how attributed errors and performance feedback affect learning from failure," Journal of Air Transport Management, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 135-143.
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