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Using Survey Data To Test for Ricardian Equivalence

Author

Listed:
  • Maarten Allers

    (University of Groningen)

  • Jakob De Haan

    (University of Groningen)

  • Flip De Kam

    (University of Groningen)

Abstract

Drawing on nationwide and representative survey data for the Netherlands, this article tests, first, to what degree economic subjects are aware of the level of both government debt and deficits, and, second, examines whether fiscal policy relates to individual saving decisions. The results presented suggest that one of the central assumptions of the Ricardian equivalence hypothesis must be refuted: most individu als have little knowledge of the government's indebtedness. Furthermore, their saving behavior appears not to be influenced by the fiscal policy stance. The authors show that individual responses vary with age, education, income, and employment status, but not with having offspring.

Suggested Citation

  • Maarten Allers & Jakob De Haan & Flip De Kam, 1998. "Using Survey Data To Test for Ricardian Equivalence," Public Finance Review, , vol. 26(6), pages 565-582, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:pubfin:v:26:y:1998:i:6:p:565-582
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    Cited by:

    1. Hayo, Bernd & Neumeier, Florian, 2017. "The (In)validity of the Ricardian equivalence theorem-findings from a representative German population survey," Munich Reprints in Economics 55053, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    2. Bernasconi, Michele & Kirchkamp, Oliver & Paruolo, Paolo, 2003. "Expectations and Perceived Causality in Fiscal Policy : An Experimental Analysis Using Real World Data," Papers 03-03, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
    3. Bernasconi, Michele & Kirchkamp, Oliver & Paruolo, Paolo, 2009. "Do fiscal variables affect fiscal expectations? Experiments with real world and lab data," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 70(1-2), pages 253-265, May.
    4. Christiane Nickel & Philipp Rother & Jan-Christoph Ruelke, 2011. "Fiscal variables and bond spreads - evidence from Eastern European countries and Turkey," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(17), pages 1291-1307.
    5. Alan D. Viard, 1999. "The new budget outlook: policymakers respond to the surplus," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q II, pages 2-15.
    6. Hayo, Bernd & Neumeier, Florian, 2017. "The (In)validity of the Ricardian equivalence theorem–findings from a representative German population survey," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 162-174.

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