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Do Fans Care About Compliance to Doping Regulations in Sports? The Impact of PED Suspension in Baseball

Author

Listed:
  • Jeffrey Cisyk
  • Pascal Courty

Abstract

There is little evidence in support of the main economic rationale for regulating athletic doping that doping reduces fan interest. The introduction of random testing for performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) by Major League Baseball (MLB) offers unique data to investigate the issue. The announcement of a PED violation (a) initially reduces home-game attendance by 8%, (b) has no impact on home-game attendance after 15 days, and (c) has a small negative impact on the game attendance for other MLB teams. This is the first systematic evidence that doping decreases consumer demand for sporting events.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey Cisyk & Pascal Courty, 2017. "Do Fans Care About Compliance to Doping Regulations in Sports? The Impact of PED Suspension in Baseball," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 18(4), pages 323-350, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:jospec:v:18:y:2017:i:4:p:323-350
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Berentsen, Aleksander, 2002. "The economics of doping," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 109-127, March.
    2. Leo Kahane & Stephen Shmanske, 1997. "Team roster turnover and attendance in major league baseball," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(4), pages 425-431.
    3. Van Reeth, Daam, 2011. "Television demand for the Tour de France: the importance of outcome uncertainty, patriotism and doping," Working Papers 2011/15, Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel, Faculteit Economie en Management.
    4. Nicolas Eber, 2008. "The Performance-Enhancing Drug Game Reconsidered," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 9(3), pages 318-327, June.
    5. Vijay Mohan & Bharat Hazari, 2016. "Cheating in Contests," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 17(7), pages 736-747, October.
    6. Elise M. Beckman & Wenqiang Cai & Rebecca M. Esrock & Robert J. Lemke, 2012. "Explaining Game-to-Game Ticket Sales for Major League Baseball Games Over Time," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 13(5), pages 536-553, October.
    7. Buechel, Berno & Emrich, Eike & Pohlkamp, Stefanie, 2013. "Nobody's innocent: the role of customers in the doping dilemma," MPRA Paper 44627, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    1. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:2:p:1104-1118 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    performance-enhancing drug; doping; baseball; major baseball league; attendance;

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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