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Relationship Between Growth and Prosperity in the 100 Largest U.S. Metropolitan Areas

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  • Eben Fodor

    (Fodor & Associates LLC, Eugene, OR, USA)

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between growth and economic prosperity in the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas to determine whether certain benefits commonly attributed to growth are supported by statistical data. The annual population growth rate of each metro area from 2000 to 2009 is used to compare economic well-being in terms of per capita income, unemployment rate, and poverty rate. The study finds that faster growth rates are associated with lower incomes, greater income declines, and higher poverty rates. Unemployment rates tend to be higher in faster growing areas, though the correlation is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence level. The 25 slowest growing metro areas outperformed the 25 fastest growing in every category and averaged $8,455 more in per capita personal income in 2009.

Suggested Citation

  • Eben Fodor, 2012. "Relationship Between Growth and Prosperity in the 100 Largest U.S. Metropolitan Areas," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 26(3), pages 220-230, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ecdequ:v:26:y:2012:i:3:p:220-230
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Timothy J. Bartik, "undated". "Who Benefits from Local Job Growth: Migrants or Original Residents?," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles tjb1993rs, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
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    5. Barbara Bergmann, 2010. "Is Prosperity Possible Without Growth?," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(5), pages 49-56.
    6. Margaret E. Dewar, 1998. "Why State and Local Economic Development Programs Cause so Little Economic Development," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 12(1), pages 68-87, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Neil Reid & Michael C. Carroll & Xinyue Ye, 2013. "The Great Recession of 2007-2009," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 27(2), pages 87-89, May.
    2. Tunstall, Thomas, 2015. "Recent Economic and Community Impact of Unconventional Oil and Gas Exploration and Production on South Texas Counties in the Eagle Ford Shale Area," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 45(1).
    3. Virginie Mamadouh & Luiza Bialasiewicz & Gordon F. Mulligan & Neil Reid & Michael S. Moore, 2016. "The Current Health of Metropolitan Labour Markets in the United States," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 107(2), pages 232-253, April.

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