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Revisiting the Apparent Paradox: Foreign Capital Inflow, Welfare Amelioration and ‘Jobless Growth’ with Agricultural Dualism and Non-traded Intermediate Input

  • Mukherjee, Soumyatanu


    (University of Calcutta)

In order to answer the pertinent question why developing countries are showing penchant for foreign capital over the last two decades in spite of its detrimental effects as revealed from the conventional two-sector mobile capital version of Harris–Todaro (HT) model in the presence of protectionist policy; this paper, in terms of a three-sector HT type general equilibrium model with agricultural dualism where advanced agricultural sector produces a non-traded intermediate input using capital apart from labour and land for the agro-based industry in the urban sector, tries to show that foreign capital inflow may not only improve social welfare, but also lower the magnitude of urban unemployment of labour or may lead to the phenomenon of ‘jobless growth’.

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Article provided by Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University in its journal Journal of Economic Integration.

Volume (Year): 27 (2012)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 123-133

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Handle: RePEc:ris:integr:0563
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  1. Khan, M. Ali, 1982. "Tariffs, foreign capital and immiserizing growth with urban unemployment and specific factors of production," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 245-256, April.
  2. Chandra, Vandana & Khan, M Ali, 1993. "Foreign Investment in the Presence of an Informal Sector," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 60(237), pages 79-103, February.
  3. Beladi, H. & Marjit, S., 1992. "Foreign Capital and Protectionism," RCER Working Papers 310, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  4. Brecher, Richard A. & Diaz Alejandro, Carlos F., 1977. "Tariffs, foreign capital and immiserizing growth," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 317-322, November.
  5. Sarbajit Chaudhuri, 2003. "How and how far to liberalize a developing economy with informal sector and factor market distortions," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 403-428.
  6. Sarbajit Chaudhuri, 2005. "Foreign Capital, Welfare And Urban Unemployment In The Presence Of Agricultural Dualism," International Trade 0510010, EconWPA.
  7. Marjit, Sugata, 1991. "Agro-based industry and rural-urban migration : A case for an urban employment subsidy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 393-398, April.
  8. Beladi, Hamid & Marjit, Sugata, 1992. "Foreign capital, unemployment and national welfare," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 311-317, December.
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