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Microsimulation Analysis of the Consequences of Monetization of Social Benefits in Russia

Author

Listed:
  • Volchkova, Natalya

    (CEFIR, Moscow)

  • Lobanov , Sergey
  • Turdyeva, Natalia

    (CEFIR, Moscow)

  • Khaleeva, Julia

    (CEFIR, Moscow)

  • Yudaeva, Ksenia

    (SRRF, Moscow)

Abstract

In 2004 a law regulating a replacement of some in-kind social benefits by cash payments was passed and liabilities for the benefit provisions were redistributed between federal and regional budgets. The objective of the paper is to study consequences of the ongoing and upcoming social benefits reforms. An estimation of the reforms conse-quences has been done by using a microsimulation modeling technique. A microsimulation model of the Russian population is built based on the data from the National Monitoring of Household Welfare and Participation in Social Programs (NOBUS).

Suggested Citation

  • Volchkova, Natalya & Lobanov , Sergey & Turdyeva, Natalia & Khaleeva, Julia & Yudaeva, Ksenia, 2006. "Microsimulation Analysis of the Consequences of Monetization of Social Benefits in Russia," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 4(4), pages 105-134.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0151
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Cockburn, 2002. "Trade Liberalisation and Poverty in Nepal: A Computable General Equilibrium Micro Simulation Analysis," CSAE Working Paper Series 2002-11, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. Andre Decoster & Inna Verbina, 2003. "Who Pays Indirect Taxes in Russia?," WIDER Working Paper Series DP2003-58, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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    Cited by:

    1. Gorlin, Yury & Kartseva, Marina & Lyashok, Victor, 2019. "The impact of the retirement age increase on the poverty level of the Russian population: Microsimulation analysis," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 54, pages 26-50.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    microsimulation; household welfare;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • R28 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Government Policy

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