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Pourquoi, pendant que la locomotive de la productivité se mettait en branle aux États-Unis, l’Europe est-elle restée en gare

  • Gordon, Robert J.

    (Northwestern University et Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR))

Registered author(s):

    After fifty years of catching up to the U. S. level of productivity, since 1995 Europe has been falling behind. The growth rate in output per hour over 1995-2003 in Europe was just half that in the United States, and this annual growth shortfall caused the level of European productivity to fall back from 94 percent of the U. S. level to 85 percent. Fully one-fifth of the European catch-up (from 44 to 94 percent) over the previous half-century has been lost over the period since 1995. Après 50 ans de rattrapage du niveau de productivité des États-Unis, l’Europe accumule du retard depuis 1995. En effet, le taux de croissance de la production horaire n’atteignait, sur le Vieux Continent, que la moitié de celui des États-Unis en 1995-2003 et cet écart annuel a ramené le niveau de la productivité européenne de 94 % du niveau des États-Unis à seulement 85 %. Un cinquième du rattrapage européen (de 44 % à 94 %) effectué dans le demi-siècle précédent a été complètement perdu depuis 1995.

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    Article provided by Société Canadienne de Science Economique in its journal L'Actualité économique.

    Volume (Year): 81 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 1 (Mars-Juin)
    Pages: 47-74

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    Handle: RePEc:ris:actuec:v:81:y:2005:i:1:p:47-74
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    1. Albers, Ronald & Vijselaar, Focco, 2002. "New technologies and productivity growth in the euro area," Working Paper Series 0122, European Central Bank.
    2. Lucia Foster & John Haltiwanger & C.J. Krizan, 2002. "The Link Between Aggregate and Micro Productivity Growth: Evidence from Retail Trade," NBER Working Papers 9120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00289168 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Stephen D. Oliner & Daniel E. Sichel, 2002. "Information technology and productivity: where are we now and where are we going?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q3, pages 15-44.
    5. Eric Bartelsman & Andrea Bassanini & John Haltiwanger & Ron Jarmin & Stefano Scarpetta & Thorsten Schank, 2002. "The Spread of ICT and Productivity Growth: Is Europe Really Lagging Behind in the New Economy?," CEPN Working Papers halshs-00289168, HAL.
    6. Goldin, Claudia, 1998. "America's Graduation from High School: The Evolution and Spread of Secondary Schooling in the Twentieth Century," Scholarly Articles 2664307, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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