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Impact of Government Borrowing on Financial Development (A case study of Pakistan)

Author

Listed:
  • Amjad Ali

    (Department of Economics, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan)

  • Farooq Ahmed

    (Department of Economics, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan)

  • Fazal- Ur- Rahman

    (Department of Economics, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan)

Abstract

Private sector of any country plays important role in the economic development of the country. It not only provides employment to the people of the country but also goods and services according to the taste of the people. Private investment depends mainly on private borrowing which proves to be the blood for private sector. Private borrowing or credit to private sector is important part of the financial development which measures the financial depth of it. The aim of this paper therefore, is to investigate the impact of government borrowing from central bank and commercial banks on financial development. In this Paper, government borrowing is used as Public domestic debt while credit to private sector (Private borrowing) is used as financial development. Normally, it is frequently observed that when government borrows more from banks, then less amount left for the private borrowing so in this way volume of private investment declines and this is found in this study. There are some other factors which also affected the private borrowing like, taxes, savings and inflation. This study has been done by using time series data of Pakistan from 1972-2015. ARDL Methodology has been used to investigate the relationship of variables. The data resource has been taken from WDI and the reports of state bank of Pakistan as well as different issues of economic survey of Pakistan.

Suggested Citation

  • Amjad Ali & Farooq Ahmed & Fazal- Ur- Rahman, 2016. "Impact of Government Borrowing on Financial Development (A case study of Pakistan)," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 5(3), pages 135-143, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:rfh:bbejor:v:5:y:2016:i:3:p:135-143
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Amjad Ali & Farooq Ahmed & Fazal- Ur- Rahman, 2016. "Impact of Government Borrowing on Financial Development (A case study of Pakistan)," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 5(3), pages 135-143, September.
    2. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-1072, June.
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    6. Ahmad, Imtiaz & Qayyum, Abdul, 2008. "Effect of Government Spending and Macro-Economic Uncertainty on Private Investment in Services Sector: Evidence from Pakistan," MPRA Paper 11673, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    11. Michael Kumhof & Evan C Tanner, 2005. "Government Debt; A Key Role in Financial Intermediation," IMF Working Papers 05/57, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Amjad Ali & Farooq Ahmed & Fazal- Ur- Rahman, 2016. "Impact of Government Borrowing on Financial Development (A case study of Pakistan)," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 5(3), pages 135-143, September.
    2. Chan Bibi & Muhammad Qasim, 2018. "The Impact of Credit Facilitation on Economic Misery in Case of Pakistan," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 7(2), pages 81-93, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Government Borrowing; Investment; Domestic Debt; Financial Development;

    JEL classification:

    • H74 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Borrowing
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • H63 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Debt; Debt Management; Sovereign Debt
    • G02 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Behavioral Finance: Underlying Principles

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