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Del mercado al instinto (o de los intereses a las pasiones)

Author

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  • Felix Ovejero Lucas

    () (Universidad de Barcelona)

Abstract

This essay analyzes liberal explanations of social order. Throughout exposition, Ovejero suggests the convenience of reviewing two central insights of liberalism, related with the way that the “problem” of social order is stated and its “solution” through the market. The “problem” is based on the unsustainable idea of presocial individuals inherent to liberalism. The article develops some arguments that shows why it has no sense to ask for the foundation of social order in that way. It supports that sociability can not be chosen, as the language can no be chosen either, in other words sociability can not be explained as a result of exchange or bargaining among individuals. The paper analyzes too the alternatives to explain the existence of social cement: passions, in terms of emotions and instincts, as the central basis that explains the way in which personal interests and the market would guarantee the social order.

Suggested Citation

  • Felix Ovejero Lucas, 2000. "Del mercado al instinto (o de los intereses a las pasiones)," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 2(2), pages 76-110, January-J.
  • Handle: RePEc:rei:ecoins:v:2:y:2000:i:2:p:76-110
    as

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    File URL: http://www.uexternado.edu.co/facecono/ecoinstitucional/workingpapers/fovejero2.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert H. Frank & Thomas Gilovich & Dennis T. Regan, 1993. "Does Studying Economics Inhibit Cooperation?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 159-171, Spring.
    2. Bergstrom, Theodore C & Stark, Oded, 1993. "How Altruism Can Prevail in an Evolutionary Environment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 149-155, May.
    3. Stephan, Paula E., 2010. "The Economics of Science," Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, Elsevier.
    4. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521555838 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Vanberg, Viktor, 1986. "Spontaneous Market Order and Social Rules," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(01), pages 75-100, April.
    6. Hahn, Frank, 1994. "Lo que pueden o no hacer los mercados," El Trimestre Económico, Fondo de Cultura Económica, vol. 0(241), pages 3-26, enero- ma.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    social order; market; individual interests; passions; emotions;

    JEL classification:

    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School
    • D59 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Other
    • D69 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Other
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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