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Cost-benefit Analysis of IUI and IVF based on willingness to pay approach; case study: Iran

Author

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  • Ali Darvishi
  • Reza Goudarzi
  • Viktoria Habib Zadeh
  • Mohsen Barouni

Abstract

Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) are often considered luxury services by policy-makers and the general population, which are always susceptible of removal from public funding of health care. The analysis of the economic aspects of this scope seems essential due to the high prevalence of infertility in Iran and the high costs of infertility treatments. This study aimed to investigate the value put on IUI and IVF treatments by communities in Iran and the affordability of services based on community preferences. A cost-benefit analysis (CBA) was performed based on the WTP approach, and the contingent valuation method (CVM) was used to estimate WTP for IUI and IVF using a researcher-made survey in two cities of Kerman and Isfahan, Iran, in 2016–17. The sample size was 604, and the study sample frame to estimate WTP included two groups of couples who were/were not aware of their fertility statuses. The costs of one cycle of IUI and IVF were calculated according to the treatment protocols, tariffs of 2016–17, and medical information records of patients. The mean direct and indirect medical costs of one cycle of IUI and IVF were equivalent to 19561140 and 60897610 IRR, respectively. Also, the mean WTP for IUI and IVF treatments were obtained of 15941061 and 28870833 IRR, respectively. The demand for IUI and IVF treatments was elastic and the community was sensitive to price changes of these treatment methods. IUI and IVF treatments brought no positive net benefits, and economic variables had the highest impact on the WTP and community preferences, indicating the significant role of financial constraints in the community's valuation for advanced infertility treatments in Iran.

Suggested Citation

  • Ali Darvishi & Reza Goudarzi & Viktoria Habib Zadeh & Mohsen Barouni, 2020. "Cost-benefit Analysis of IUI and IVF based on willingness to pay approach; case study: Iran," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(7), pages 1-13, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:plo:pone00:0231584
    DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0231584
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    References listed on IDEAS

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