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Agri-Environmental Stewardship Schemes and “Multifunctionality”

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  • Thomas L. Dobbs
  • Jules N. Pretty

Abstract

The United Kingdom introduced the first agri-environmental scheme in the European Union in 1986. Since then, the United Kingdom has developed and implemented several other schemes that also feature stewardship payments to improve agriculture's environmental performance. In this article, lessons learned from the United Kingdom's agri-environmental programs are identified. Using the concept of “multifunctionality,” which increasingly is influencing agricultural policy in Western Europe, the authors examine key issues associated with potential major expansions of stewardship payment schemes on both sides of the Atlantic. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas L. Dobbs & Jules N. Pretty, 2004. "Agri-Environmental Stewardship Schemes and “Multifunctionality”," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 26(2), pages 220-237.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:revage:v:26:y:2004:i:2:p:220-237
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-9353.2004.00172.x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Baylis, Kathy & Peplow, Stephen & Rausser, Gordon & Simon, Leo, 2008. "Agri-environmental policies in the EU and United States: A comparison," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(4), pages 753-764, May.
    2. Scott Steele, 2010. "An Organisational Discussion of Incomplete Contracting and Transaction Costs in Conservation Contracts," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(1), pages 163-174.
    3. Chouinard, Hayley H. & Wandschneider, Philip R. & Paterson, Tobias, 2016. "Inferences from sparse data: An integrated, meta-utility approach to conservation research," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 71-78.
    4. Moon, Wanki & Griffith, Jacob Wayne, 2011. "Assessing holistic economic value for multifunctional agriculture in the US," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 455-465, August.
    5. Lisa Lobry de Bruyn & Susan Andrews, 2016. "Are Australian and United States Farmers Using Soil Information for Soil Health Management?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(4), pages 1-33, March.
    6. Jean McGuire & Lois Morton & Alicia Cast, 2013. "Reconstructing the good farmer identity: shifts in farmer identities and farm management practices to improve water quality," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 30(1), pages 57-69, March.
    7. Jolejole, Christina B. & Swinton, Scott M. & Robertson, G. Philip & Syswerda, Sara P., 2009. "Profitability and Environmental Stewardship for Row Crop Production: Are There Trade-offs?," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 50920, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Posthumus, H. & Rouquette, J.R. & Morris, J. & Gowing, D.J.G. & Hess, T.M., 2010. "A framework for the assessment of ecosystem goods and services; a case study on lowland floodplains in England," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(7), pages 1510-1523, May.
    9. Bartolini, Fabio & Gallerani, Vittorio & Viaggi, Davide, 2008. "Ex-Ante Evaluation Of Agri-Environmental Schemes: Combining Elements Of Private And Public Decision Making," 107th Seminar, January 30-February 1, 2008, Sevilla, Spain 6639, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:4:p:304:d:66850 is not listed on IDEAS

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