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Saving and pension reform in general equilibrium models

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Abstract

In this paper we study saving and pension reform in the context of general equilibrium models. We discuss some of the reasons for the existence of a social security system. We highlight the key features of the US data that a general equilibrium model of saving and social security should match: the life-cycle profiles of savings, consumption and hours worked, and the aggregate capital-output ratio and saving rate. We describe the structure of a general equilibrium model, and discuss how its parameters are estimated or calibrated from the data. We present the quantitative results from some policy experiments previously computed in the literature, first in the context of stationary demographics and then with an ageing population, and highlight the key policy prescriptions that we learn from these experiments. We conclude by providing some directions for future research. Copyright 2001, Oxford University Press.

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  • M De Nardi & S Imrohoroglu & TJ Sargent, 2001. "Saving and pension reform in general equilibrium models," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(1), pages 20-39, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:17:y:2001:i:1:p:20-39
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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Babecky & Kamil Dybczak, 2009. "The Impact of Population Ageing on the Czech Economy," Working Papers 2009/1, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    2. Alonso-Ortiz, Jorge, 2014. "Social security and retirement across the OECD," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 300-316.
    3. Mérette Marcel & Georges Patrick, 2010. "Demographic Changes and the Gains from Globalisation: An Analysis of Ageing, Capital Flows, and International Trade," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 10(3), pages 1-39, October.
    4. Marco Bassetto, 2008. "Political Economy of Taxation in an Overlapping-Generations Economy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(1), pages 18-43, January.
    5. K. Mc Morrow & W. Röger, 2002. "EU pension reform - An overview of the debate and an empirical assessment of the main policy reform options," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 162, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    6. Garry Young, 2002. "The implications of an ageing population for the UK economy," Bank of England working papers 159, Bank of England.
    7. Bagis, Bilal, 2017. "Macroeconomic Implications of Changes in Social Security Rules," MPRA Paper 84051, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Hans Fehr & Christian Habermann & Fabian Kindermann, 2008. "Tax-Favored Retirement Accounts: Are they Efficient in Increasing Savings and Growth?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 64(2), pages 171-198, June.
    9. Attanasio Orazio P. & Kitao Sagiri & Violante Giovanni L., 2006. "Quantifying the Effects of the Demographic Transition in Developing Economies," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-44, April.

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