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The amenity value of climate to households in Germany

Author

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  • Katrin Rehdanz
  • David Maddison

Abstract

Despite the importance of as comprehensive as possible damage cost estimates to cost benefit analyses of global attempts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, few researchers have attempted to monetize the direct impact of climate change on households. This study uses the hedonic technique to measure the amenity value of the climate to German households. Evidence suggests that the amenity value of climate variables is capitalized mainly into hedonic house price differentials. Overall, German households appear to prefer warmer winters with less rainfall. Combining estimates of amenity values with the predicted changes in climate associated with the IPCC's A2 emissions scenario we find that the overall impact of climate change on German households, whilst negative, is typically not statistically different from zero. This occurs in part because the prediction is for warmer but wetter winters and also because the amenity value of some climate variables cannot be measured with sufficient precision. Copyright 2009 , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Katrin Rehdanz & David Maddison, 2009. "The amenity value of climate to households in Germany," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(1), pages 150-167, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:61:y:2009:i:1:p:150-167
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpn028
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maddison, David & Rehdanz, Katrin, 2011. "The impact of climate on life satisfaction," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 2437-2445.
    2. repec:wsi:ccexxx:v:04:y:2013:i:01:n:s2010007813500048 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Leonardo Becchetti, 2010. "The Money–Happiness Relationship in Transition Countries: Evidence from Albania," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 17(1), pages 39-62, May.
    4. Chauvin, Juan Pablo & Glaeser, Edward & Ma, Yueran & Tobio, Kristina, 2017. "What is different about urbanization in rich and poor countries? Cities in Brazil, China, India and the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 17-49.
    5. Howard, Peter H., 2012. "Climate Change, Vegetation, and Welfare: Estimating the Welfare Loss to Landowners of Marginal Shifts in Blue Oak Habitat," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124744, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Dan S. Rickman, 2014. "Assessing Regional Quality of Life: A Call for Action in Regional Science," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 44(1), pages 1-12, Spring.
    7. Zhou Yuan & Richard S.J. Tol, 2005. "Water Use in China’s Domestic, Industrial and Agricultural Sectors: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers FNU-67, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jun 2005.
    8. David Maddison & Katrin Rehdanz & Daiju Narita, 2013. "The household production function approach to valuing climate: the case of Japan," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 116(2), pages 207-229, January.
    9. Zanni, Alberto M. & Ryley, Tim J., 2015. "The impact of extreme weather conditions on long distance travel behaviour," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 305-319.
    10. repec:wsi:ccexxx:v:05:y:2014:i:03:n:s2010007814500092 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Kopmann, Angela & Rehdanz, Katrin, 2013. "A human well-being approach for assessing the value of natural land areas," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 20-33.
    12. Thomas Murray & David Maddison & Katrin Rehdanz, 2013. "Do Geographical Variations In Climate Influence Life-Satisfaction?," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(01), pages 1-21.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R29 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Other
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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