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Cyclical and Structural Influences on Irish Unemployment

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  • Walsh, Brendan

Abstract

In the course of the 1990s the Irish unemployment rate moved from near the top to close to the bottom of the EU league table. This paper identifies the cyclical and structural factors that have contributed to the transformation of the Irish labour market. A steady gain in competitiveness facilitated rapid growth in output and employment. The links between Irish and British unemployment rates have weakened as rapid economic growth has reduced Irish unemployment to historically low levels. The role of structural changes, including the relative generosity of the social welfare system and the wage bargaining process, are discussed. Copyright 2000 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Walsh, Brendan, 2000. "Cyclical and Structural Influences on Irish Unemployment," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(1), pages 119-145, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:52:y:2000:i:1:p:119-45
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    Cited by:

    1. Valerie Cerra & Jarkko Soikkeli & Sweta C. Saxena, 2003. "How Competitive is Irish Manufacturing?," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 34(2), pages 173-193.
    2. Brendan M. Walsh, 2004. "The transformation of the Irish labour market : 1980-2003," Working Papers 200412, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    3. Patrick Honohan & Anthony J. Leddin, 2006. "Ireland in EMU - More Shocks, Less Insulation?," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 37(2), pages 263-294.
    4. J. Peter Neary, 2006. "Measuring Competitiveness," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 37(2), pages 197-213.
    5. David E. Bloom & David Canning, 2003. "Contraception and the Celtic Tiger," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 34(3), pages 229-247.
    6. Bergin, Adele & Kearney, Ide, 2007. "Human capital accumulation in an open labour market: Ireland in the 1990s," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 839-858, November.

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