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African Growth: Why a 'Big Push'?

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  • Paul Collier

Abstract

Over the past 40 years Africa has stagnated while other developing countries have grasped growth opportunities. This process of divergence has turned Africa into the poorest region. Africa needs a big push to escape from four development traps: the conflict trap, the corruption trap, the primary commodity trap and the fractionalized society trap. Since these low level equilibria have been sustained over some time a marginal effort is unlikely to be successful. However, the traps weaken the effectiveness of aid, making increased aid unlikely to be a successful instrument to push Africa's development. This paper suggests four non-traditional policy instruments donors can use in addition to increased aid: a security guarantee, templates of good governance, temporary trade preferences and the conditioning aid on processes of governance rather than on policies. Copyright 2006, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Collier, 2006. "African Growth: Why a 'Big Push'?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(2), pages 188-211, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:15:y:2006:i:2:p:188-211
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wim Naudé, 2010. "Africa And The Global Economic Crisis: A Risk Assessment And Action Guide," EUI-RSCAS Working Papers 27, European University Institute (EUI), Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (RSCAS).
    2. Manfred Wiebelt & Rainer Schweickert & Clemens Breisinger & Marcus Böhme, 2011. "Oil revenues for public investment in Africa: targeting urban or rural areas?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 147(4), pages 745-770, November.
    3. Temple, Jonathan R.W., 2010. "Aid and Conditionality," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    4. Berg, Andrew & Portillo, Rafael & Zanna, Luis-Felipe, 2015. "Policy Responses to Aid Surges in Countries with Limited International Capital Mobility: The Role of the Exchange Rate Regime," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 116-129.
    5. repec:spr:jecstr:v:6:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40008-017-0092-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ndambendia, Houdou, 2014. "Exports diversification and knowledge sharing from south-south and south-north economic cooperation: evidence from the Central and West Africa," MPRA Paper 71571, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2015.
    7. Joshua K. Ault & Andrew Spicer, 2014. "The institutional context of poverty: State fragility as a predictor of cross-national variation in commercial microfinance lending," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(12), pages 1818-1838, December.
    8. Unbreen Qayyum & Hasan Siftain, 2014. "Governance and the Effectiveness of Foreign Capital," PIDE-Working Papers 2014:98, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.

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