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Institutions and Development

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  • Robert H. Bates

Abstract

In late-century Africa, domestic reformers and the international community prescribed political reform as a means for securing policy reform. They sought to put an end to single party and military government and introduced multiparty politics. Using a principal agent framework, the author assesses the logical validity of these efforts. And employing a game theoretic approach, he traces the impact of political reform on political stability. He employs a panel of data from both African and global samples to measure the impact of reform on the economics and politics of Africa. The evidence suggests that reform has measurably curtailed the opportunistic use of politcal power, failed to influence the formulation of macro-economic policy, and increased the likelihood of political disorder. Copyright 2006, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert H. Bates, 2006. "Institutions and Development," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(1), pages 10-61, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:15:y:2006:i:1:p:10-61
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    Cited by:

    1. Lopez-Uribe, Maria del Pilar & Castells-Quintana, David & McDermott, Thomas K. J., 2017. "Geography, institutions and development: a review ofthe long-run impacts of climate change," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 65147, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. FOSU, Augustin Kwasi, 2008. "Democracy and growth in Africa: Implications of increasing electoral competitiveness," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 442-444, September.
    3. Marc G Quintyn & Sophia Gollwitzer, 2012. "Institutional Transformations, Polity and Economic Outcomes; Testing the North-Wallis-Weingast Doorsteps Framework," IMF Working Papers 12/87, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Charles Mueller, 2014. "The Economics of the Brazilian Model of Agricultural Development author-name: Bernardo Mueller," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series iriba_wp01, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    5. Ogunleye, Eric Kehinde, 2011. "Emerging Evidence on the Relative Importance of Sectoral Sources of Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 061, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Aderoju Oyefusi, 2007. "Oil-dependence and Civil conflict in Nigeria," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2007-09, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    7. Ranis, Gustav, 2010. "Diversity of Communities and Economic Development: An Overview," Working Papers 6, JICA Research Institute.
    8. Haque, Tobias A. & Knight, David S. & Jayasuriya, Dinuk S., 2012. "Capacity constraints and public financial management in small Pacific Island countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6297, The World Bank.
    9. David Castells-Quintana & Maria del Pilar Lopez-Uribe & Tom McDermott, 2015. "Climate change and the geographical and institutional drivers of economic development," GRI Working Papers 198, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.

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