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Contingent Valuation of the Public Benefits of Agricultural Wildlife Management: The Case of Dutch Peat Meadow Land

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  • Brouwer, Roy
  • Slangen, Louis H G

Abstract

The public benefits of agricultural wildlife management are estimated by means of the contingent valuation method. Households are asked for their willingness to pay for wildlife preservation measures taken by farmers. Corresponding with the survey's three-stage budgeting structure, a non-linear recursive model is used to test the study's construct validity. Since the method is not undisputed and rapidly evolving, the outcomes of the study are accompanied by an extensive discussion of the way the method is applied. A rough cost-benefit analysis indicates that current policy towards management agreements is justified based on the neo-Paretian welfare criterion. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Brouwer, Roy & Slangen, Louis H G, 1998. "Contingent Valuation of the Public Benefits of Agricultural Wildlife Management: The Case of Dutch Peat Meadow Land," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 53-72.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:25:y:1998:i:1:p:53-72
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    Cited by:

    1. Cho, Seong-Hoon & Yen, Steven T. & Bowker, James Michael & Newman, David H., 2008. "Modeling Willingness to Pay for Land Conservation Easements: Treatment of Zero and Protest Bids and Application and Policy Implications," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 40(01), April.
    2. Ojea, Elena & Loureiro, Maria L., 2011. "Identifying the scope effect on a meta-analysis of biodiversity valuation studies," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 706-724, September.
    3. Weber, Gerald, 2003. "Internationaler Handel und multifunktionale Landwirtschaft : Ein Agrarsektormodell zur Analyse Politischer Optionen und Entscheidungsunterstutzung," Working Paper Series 18824, Humboldt University Berlin, Department Agricultural Economics.
    4. Thilo W. Glebe & Uwe Latacz-Lohmann, 2008. "Assessing the production and welfare effects of agri-environmental policy: a conceptual analysis," Journal of Socio-Economics in Agriculture (Until 2015: Yearbook of Socioeconomics in Agriculture), Swiss Society for Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, vol. 1(1), pages 75-92.
    5. Jie He & Anping Huang & Luodan Xu, 2015. "Spatial heterogeneity and transboundary pollution: a contingent valuation study on the Xijiang River drainage basin in south China," Cahiers de recherche 15-04, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
    6. repec:eee:ecolec:v:139:y:2017:i:c:p:75-90 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Nico Polman & Arianne de Blaeij & Stijn Reinhard & Louis Slangen, 2011. "Landscape and the commercial benefits of recreation," ERSA conference papers ersa10p910, European Regional Science Association.
    8. He, Jie & Huang, Anping & Xu, Luodan, 2015. "Spatial heterogeneity and transboundary pollution: A contingent valuation (CV) study on the Xijiang River drainage basin in south China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 101-130.
    9. Brouwer, Roy & Martín-Ortega, Julia, 2012. "Modeling self-censoring of polluter pays protest votes in stated preference research to support resource damage estimations in environmental liability," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 151-166.
    10. Jongeneel, Roel & Polman, Nico & van der Ham, Corinda, 2014. "Costs and benefits associated with the externalities generated by Dutch agriculture," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182705, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    11. Schaafsma, Marije & Brouwer, Roy & Rose, John, 2012. "Directional heterogeneity in WTP models for environmental valuation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 21-31.
    12. Aliza Fleischer & Daniel Felsenstein, 2002. "Cost-Benefit Analysis Using Economic Surpluses: A Case Study of a Televised Event," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 26(2), pages 139-156, May.
    13. Moon, Wanki & Griffith, Jacob Wayne, 2011. "Assessing holistic economic value for multifunctional agriculture in the US," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 455-465, August.
    14. Ingo Bräuer & Rainer Marggraf, 2004. "Valuation of Ecosystem Services Provided by Biodiversity Conservation: An Integrated Hydrological and Economic Model to Value the Enhanced Nitrogen Retention in Renaturated Streams," Working Papers 2004.54, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    15. Katrin Oltmer & Peter Nijkamp & Raymond Florax & Floor Brouwer, 2000. "A Meta-Analysis of Environmental Impacts of Agri-Environmental Policies in the European Union," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 00-083/3, Tinbergen Institute.

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