IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/onb/oenbmp/y2006i2b2.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Is Germany’s Influence on Austria Waning?

Author

Abstract

This study analyzes the connection between business cycle fluctuations in Germany and Austria as well as the transmission of German shocks to Austria. Compared to Austria’s links with other countries, the ties between Austria and Germany have loosened in relative terms in recent years; in terms of gross domestic product (GDP), however, a strong and steady increase has been recorded. Static and dynamic correlation measures point to a consistently high level of co-movement between Austria and Germany. While the Austrian economy lagged behind the German economy by one quarter in the 1970s, it now leads the German economy by one quarter. The Austrian economy’s reaction to German shocks equals 0.4 times the German reaction. Monetary policy shocks are transmitted with the greatest impact, while supply and demand shocks trigger a far less pronounced reaction in Austria. Over time, monetary policy shocks have gained slightly in importance, while German demand shocks have become less important. On average across shocks, the transmission effect shows a marginal weakening. The relative importance of Germany and the international environment in explaining the forecast error for Austrian GDP has increased somewhat over time, whereas the domestic contribution to the forecast error has declined. On the whole, it is not possible to identify a decline in Germany’s importance for the Austrian economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerhard Fenz & Martin Schneider, 2006. "Is Germany’s Influence on Austria Waning?," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 2, pages 24-45.
  • Handle: RePEc:onb:oenbmp:y:2006:i:2:b:2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.oenb.at/dam/jcr:753533db-7d46-48d0-b619-7179e2dd239c/mop_2006_2_02_tcm16-45582.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles L., 1999. "Monetary policy shocks: What have we learned and to what end?," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 65-148 Elsevier.
    2. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2003. "Has the business cycle changed?," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 9-56.
    3. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
    4. Canova, Fabio & de Nicolo, Gianni, 2003. "On the sources of business cycles in the G-7," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 77-100, January.
    5. Fabio Canova, 2005. "The transmission of US shocks to Latin America," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 229-251.
    6. Hochreiter, Eduard & Winckler, Georg, 1995. "The advantages of tying Austria's hands: The success of the hard currency strategy," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 83-111, March.
    7. Yin-Wong Cheung & Frank Westermann, 1999. "An analysis of German effects on the Austrian business cycle," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 135(3), pages 522-531, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Brunhart, 2015. "The Swiss Business Cycle and the Lead of Small Neighbor Liechtenstein," Arbeitspapiere 51, Liechtenstein-Institut.
    2. repec:onb:oenbwp:y::i:137:b:1 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    business-cycle; synchronization; vector autoregression; shock-identification; transmission.;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:onb:oenbmp:y:2006:i:2:b:2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Claudia Kwapil). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/oenbbat.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.