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Corporate Tax Incidence: Review of General Equilibrium Estimates and Analysis


  • Gravelle, Jennifer


This paper identifies the major drivers of corporate tax incidence in open-economy general equilibrium models and compares estimates from four major studies. These studies vary in their elasticity assumptions, and adjusting the estimates to reflect central empirical estimates of those elasticities suggests capital bears the majority of the corporate income tax burden. This paper further presents an alternative method for determining corporate tax incidence that distinguishes between global effects of corporate taxes and excise effects that vary among nations. Under this approach, even in an open economy, capital could bear virtually the entire tax burden.

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  • Gravelle, Jennifer, 2013. "Corporate Tax Incidence: Review of General Equilibrium Estimates and Analysis," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 66(1), pages 185-214, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:66:y:2013:i:1:p:185-214

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Daniel S. Hamermesh & James Grant, 1979. "Econometric Studies of Labor-Labor Substitution and Their Implications for Policy," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(4), pages 543-562.
    2. Batra, Raveendra N., 1975. "A general equilibrium model of the incidence of corporation income tax under uncertainty," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 343-360, November.
    3. Chirinko, Robert S. & Fazzari, Steven M. & Meyer, Andrew P., 1999. "How responsive is business capital formation to its user cost?: An exploration with micro data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 53-80, October.
    4. Zodrow, George R. & Mieszkowski, Peter M., 1986. "The new view of the property tax A reformulation," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 309-327, August.
    5. Gravelle, Jane G & Kotlikoff, Laurence J, 1989. "The Incidence and Efficiency Costs of Corporate Taxation When Corporate and Noncorporate Firms Produce the Same Good," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 749-780, August.
    6. Parai, Amar K, 1988. "The Incidence of Corporate Income Tax under Variable Returns to Scale," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 43(3), pages 414-424.
    7. Mutti, John & Grubert, Harry, 1985. "The taxation of capital income in an open economy: the importance of resident-nonresident tax treatment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 291-309, August.
    8. Iris Claus & Norman Gemmell & Michelle Harding & David White (ed.), 2010. "Tax Reform in Open Economies," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13704.
    9. Bhatia, Kul B., 1981. "Intermediate goods and the incidence of the corporation income tax," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 93-112, August.
    10. Baron, David P & Forsythe, Robert, 1981. "Uncertainty and the Theory of Tax Incidence in a Stock Market Economy," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 22(3), pages 567-576, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Carlos Suárez Serrato & Owen Zidar, 2016. "Who Benefits from State Corporate Tax Cuts? A Local Labor Markets Approach with Heterogeneous Firms," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(9), pages 2582-2624, September.
    2. Liu, Li & Altshuler, Rosanne, 2013. "Measuring the Burden of the Corporate Income Tax Under Imperfect Competition," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 66(1), pages 215-237, March.
    3. Richard M. Bird & Eric M. Zolt, 2014. "Taxation and inequality in the Americas: Changing the fiscal contract?," Chapters,in: Taxation and Development: The Weakest Link?, chapter 7, pages 193-237 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Clausing, Kimberly A., 2013. "Who Pays the Corporate Tax in a Global Economy?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 66(1), pages 151-184, March.
    5. Alvarez-Martinez, Maria & Barrios, Salvador & d'Andria, Diego & Gesualdo, Maria & Nicodème, Gaëtan & Pycroft, Jonathan, 2018. "How Large is the Corporate Tax Base Erosion and Profit Shifting? A General Equilibrium Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 12637, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. repec:aea:aecrev:v:108:y:2018:i:2:p:393-418 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Kenneth J. McKenzie & Ergete Ferede, 2017. "The Incidence of the Corporate Income Tax on Wages: Evidence from Canadian Provinces," SPP Research Papers, The School of Public Policy, University of Calgary, vol. 10(7), April.
    8. Antonio Estache & Brigitta Gersey, 2018. "Do Corporate Income Tax Rates Cuts Create Jobs? The European Experience," Working Papers ECARES 2018-01, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    9. repec:clh:resear:v:10:y:2017:i:6 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Thomas K. Bauer & Tanja Kasten & Lars-H. R. Siemers, 2017. "Business Taxation and Wages: Redistribution and Asymmetric Effects," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 182-17, Universität Siegen, Fakultät Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Wirtschaftsinformatik und Wirtschaftsrecht.
    11. Clemens Fuest & Andreas Peichl & Sebastian Siegloch, 2018. "Do Higher Corporate Taxes Reduce Wages? Micro Evidence from Germany," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 108(2), pages 393-418, February.
    12. Fuest, Clemens & Peichl, Andreas & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2015. "Do Higher Corporate Taxes Reduce Wages?," IZA Discussion Papers 9606, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Nelly Exbrayat & Benny Geys, 2015. "Economic Integration, Corporate Tax Incidence and Fiscal Compensation," Working Papers 1534, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    14. Siegloch, Sebastian, 2014. "Employment Effects of Local Business Taxes," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100325, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    15. repec:bla:worlde:v:39:y:2016:i:11:p:1792-1811 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Olena, Sokolovska, 2017. "Corporate tax incidence and its implications for the labor market," MPRA Paper 83401, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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