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The Rise and Fall of the Oslo School

Author

Listed:
  • Ib E. Eriksen

    (University of Agder, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, Kristiansand, Norway)

  • Tore Jørgen Hanisch

    (University of Agder, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, Kristiansand, Norway)

  • Arild Sæther

    (University of Agder, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, Kristiansand, Norway)

Abstract

In 1931 Ragnar Frisch became professor at the University of Oslo. By way of his research, a new study programme and new staff he created the ”Oslo School”, characterised by mathematical modelling, econometrics, economic planning and scepticism towards the market economy. Consequently, detailed state economic planning and governance dominated Norwegian economic policy for three decades after WWII. In the 1970s the School’s dominance came to an end when the belief in competitive markets gained a foothold and the economy had poor performance. As a result a decentralized market economy was reintroduced. However, mathematical modelling and econometrics remain in the core of most economic programmes.

Suggested Citation

  • Ib E. Eriksen & Tore Jørgen Hanisch & Arild Sæther, 2007. "The Rise and Fall of the Oslo School," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 33, pages 1-1.
  • Handle: RePEc:noj:journl:v:33:y:2007:p:1
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    File URL: http://www.nopecjournal.org/NOPEC_2007_a01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McCloskey, Donald N, 1976. "Does the Past Have Useful Economics?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 434-461, June.
    2. Filippo Cesarano, 2006. "Economic history and economic theory," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(4), pages 447-467.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • B23 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Econometrics; Quantitative and Mathematical Studies
    • B29 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Other
    • B31 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought: Individuals - - - Individuals
    • B59 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Other
    • O21 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Planning Models; Planning Policy
    • P41 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform
    • P51 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems

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