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Economic history and economic theory

Author

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  • Filippo Cesarano

Abstract

Since the mid-1950s the spread of formal models and econometric method has greatly improved the study of the past, giving rise to the 'new' economic history; at the same time, the influence of economic history on economists and economics has markedly declined. This paper argues that the contribution of history to the advancement of economics is still paramount, as is evident from the evolution of monetary theory and institutions.JEL classification: NO1, A12

Suggested Citation

  • Filippo Cesarano, 2006. "Economic history and economic theory," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(4), pages 447-467.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jecmet:v:13:y:2006:i:4:p:447-467
    DOI: 10.1080/13501780601049038
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McCloskey, Donald N, 1976. "Does the Past Have Useful Economics?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 434-461, June.
    2. North, Douglass C, 1976. "The Place of Economic History in the Discipline of Economics," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 14(4), pages 461-465, December.
    3. Kuznets, Simon, 1957. "Summary of Discusson and Postscript," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(04), pages 545-553, December.
    4. Robert A. Mundell, 2000. "A Reconsideration of the Twentieth Century," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 327-340, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bruno Chiarini, 2008. "Milton Friedman: la moneta, il metodo e la politica," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 98(1), pages 39-56, January-F.
    2. Jorge Streb, 2010. "Hume: The power of abduction and simple observation in economics," CEMA Working Papers: Serie Documentos de Trabajo. 417, Universidad del CEMA.
    3. Filippo Cesarano, 2006. "Optimum currency areas: a policy view," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 59(239), pages 317-332.
    4. Einar Lie, 2007. "Economic History and Economic Theory," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 33, pages 1-2.
    5. Filippo Cesarano, 2006. "Optimum currency areas: a policy view," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 59(239), pages 317-332.
    6. Ib E. Eriksen & Tore Jørgen Hanisch & Arild Sæther, 2007. "The Rise and Fall of the Oslo School," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 33, pages 1-1.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic history; economic theory;

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines

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