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A kis országok világgazdasági alkalmazkodása
[The adaptation of small countries to the world economy]

Author

Listed:
  • Csaba, László

    ()

Abstract

A cikk azt a kérdést vizsgálja, hogy a globalizálódás és a megafúziók világában életképesek lehetnek-e a kis országok, s ha igen, milyen feltételekkel. Az írás azt igyekszik igazolni, hogy a műszaki fejlődés új iránya és a nemzetközi pénzügyek formálódó reformja megnöveli az alkalmazkodásra kész kis nemzetgazdaságok életképességét. Ez a sikeres regionális integrálódásuk alapja, nem pedig fordítva. A globalizáció új esélyeket ad a kicsiknek.

Suggested Citation

  • Csaba, László, 2000. "A kis országok világgazdasági alkalmazkodása
    [The adaptation of small countries to the world economy]
    ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(9), pages 662-679.
  • Handle: RePEc:ksa:szemle:340
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Frederic S. Mishkin, 1999. "Global Financial Instability: Framework, Events, Issues," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 3-20, Fall.
    2. Johan Torstensson, 1998. "Country size and comparative advantage: An empirical study," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 134(4), pages 590-611, December.
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    7. Fischer, Stanley, 1999. "Reforming the International Financial System," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(459), pages 557-576, November.
    8. VANHOUDT, Patrick, 1997. "Did the European unification increase economic growth? In search of scale-effects and persistent changes," SESO Working Papers 1997010, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics.
    9. Steven Fries & Martin Raiser & Nicholas Stern, 1999. "Stress test for reforms: Transition and East Asian 'contagion'," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(2), pages 535-567, July.
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    13. Schuler, Kurt, 1999. "The Problem with Pegged Exchange Rates," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 83-102.
    14. Darvas, Zsolt & Szapáry, György, 1999. "A nemzetközi pénzügyi válságok tovaterjedése különböző árfolyamrendszerekben
      [The spread of international financial crises under various exchange-rate systems]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(11), pages 945-968.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration

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