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Competing explanations of the Minsky moment: The financial instability hypothesis in light of Austrian theory

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  • David Prychitko

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Suggested Citation

  • David Prychitko, 2010. "Competing explanations of the Minsky moment: The financial instability hypothesis in light of Austrian theory," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 199-221, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:revaec:v:23:y:2010:i:3:p:199-221 DOI: 10.1007/s11138-009-0097-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. L. Randall Wray, 2009. "The rise and fall of money manager capitalism: a Minskian approach," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(4), pages 807-828, July.
    2. Kirzner, Israel M, 1999. "Creativity and/or Alertness: A Reconsideration of the Schumpeterian Entrepreneur," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 11(1-2), pages 5-17.
    3. John B. Taylor, 2009. "Getting Off Track - How Government Actions and Interventions Caused, Prolonged, and Worsened the Financial Crisis," Books, Hoover Institution, Stanford University, number 3.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lawrence H. White, 2015. "Skepticism About Minsky's Financial Instability Hypothesis: A Comment on Flanders," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 12(1), pages 106-113, January.
    2. Simona Elena IAGAR, 2015. "Implications Of Banking Supervision Across The European Monetary Union, A Sovereign Debt Crisis Update," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 7(2a), pages 479-488, September.
    3. Mulligan Robert F. & Coffee David & Lirely Roger, 2014. "An Empirical Examination of Minsky’s Financial Instability Hypothesis: From Market Process to Austrian Business Cycle," Journal des Economistes et des Etudes Humaines, De Gruyter, vol. 20(1), pages 1-17, July.
    4. Cachanosky, Nicolas, 2014. "The effects of U.S. monetary policy on Colombia and Panama (2002–2007)," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 428-436.
    5. Van Den Hauwe Ludwig, 2016. "Understanding Financial Instability: Minsky Versus the Austrians," Journal des Economistes et des Etudes Humaines, De Gruyter, vol. 22(1), pages 25-60, July.
    6. Koppl, Roger, 2010. "Some epistemological implications of economic complexity," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 859-872, December.
    7. Paul Mueller, 2014. "An Austrian view of expectations and business cycles," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 27(2), pages 199-214, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Hyman Minsky; Austrian economics; Financial instability; Business cycles; Recession; Crisis; B25; E32; E44; E58;

    JEL classification:

    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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